Texture segmentation as a function of eccentricity, spatial frequency and target size

Texture segmentation as a function of eccentricity, spatial frequency and target size Texture segmentation as a function of eccentricity, spatial frequency and target size KENNETH M. JOFFE and CHARLES T. SCIALFA* Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, 72N 1N4 Canada Received 20 October 1994; revised 3 March 1995; accepted 8 April 1995 Abstract-Two experiments examined the role of fundamental spatial frequency, target area and retinal eccentricity in texture segmentation. In Experiment 1, a backward-masked target comprising lines oriented orthogonally to the surround was briefly presented at the fovea, and at eccentricities ranging from 2.55 to 7.63 deg. Reaction time and accuracy were better when targets were presented at non-foveal locations. In Experiment 2, eccentricity effects were examined when both spatial frequency and target area were varied. Accuracy was highest and RT fastest at near-peripheral, not foveal locations. The eccentricity corresponding to optimal performance was related inversely to spatial frequency. Results suggest that the near periphery is more adept than the fovea at the early processing which underlies rapid texture segmentation. 1. INTRODUCTION . Early-stage visual processing is thought to be responsible for texture segmentation, the ability to segregate a target from its surround. Initially, texton theory (Julesz, 1981 a,b; 1984) postulated that texture segmentation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010) Brill

Texture segmentation as a function of eccentricity, spatial frequency and target size

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 1995 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0169-1015
eISSN
1568-5683
D.O.I.
10.1163/156856895X00034
Publisher site
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Abstract

Texture segmentation as a function of eccentricity, spatial frequency and target size KENNETH M. JOFFE and CHARLES T. SCIALFA* Department of Psychology, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, 72N 1N4 Canada Received 20 October 1994; revised 3 March 1995; accepted 8 April 1995 Abstract-Two experiments examined the role of fundamental spatial frequency, target area and retinal eccentricity in texture segmentation. In Experiment 1, a backward-masked target comprising lines oriented orthogonally to the surround was briefly presented at the fovea, and at eccentricities ranging from 2.55 to 7.63 deg. Reaction time and accuracy were better when targets were presented at non-foveal locations. In Experiment 2, eccentricity effects were examined when both spatial frequency and target area were varied. Accuracy was highest and RT fastest at near-peripheral, not foveal locations. The eccentricity corresponding to optimal performance was related inversely to spatial frequency. Results suggest that the near periphery is more adept than the fovea at the early processing which underlies rapid texture segmentation. 1. INTRODUCTION . Early-stage visual processing is thought to be responsible for texture segmentation, the ability to segregate a target from its surround. Initially, texton theory (Julesz, 1981 a,b; 1984) postulated that texture segmentation

Journal

Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1995

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