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Terrifying Thoughts: Power, Order, and Terror After 9/11

Terrifying Thoughts: Power, Order, and Terror After 9/11 Global Governance 11 (2005), 247–271 REVIEW ESSAY Terrifying Thoughts: Power, Order, and Terror After 9/11 Steven E. Miller The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, had a profound effect on the Bush administration’s foreign policy. This review essay examines a set of books and documents that illuminate the dominant U.S. threat perceptions in the post–September 11 environment and analyze both the strategies and the new directions that have emerged in U.S. policy in response to the new threat perceptions. Several of the books under review explore the deep socioeconomic and ideological origins of the wide support found in the U.S. public for the Bush administration’s bold and often controversial policy choices. Taken together, these works convey the impression that Bush’s strategic impulses will have considerable staying power in the U.S. body politic. KEYWORDS: Bush doctrine, terrorism/war on terrorism, grand strategy, terrorist threat, U.S. foreign policy. Richard A. Clarke, et al., Defeating the Jihadists: A Blueprint for Action (New York: Century Foundation Press, 2004), 172 pp. David Frum and Richard Perle, An End to Evil: How to Win the War on Terror (New York: Ballantine Books, 2004), 280 pp. John Lewis Gaddis, Surprise, Security, and the American Experience (Cambridge: Harvard http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Terrifying Thoughts: Power, Order, and Terror After 9/11

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01102008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 11 (2005), 247–271 REVIEW ESSAY Terrifying Thoughts: Power, Order, and Terror After 9/11 Steven E. Miller The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, had a profound effect on the Bush administration’s foreign policy. This review essay examines a set of books and documents that illuminate the dominant U.S. threat perceptions in the post–September 11 environment and analyze both the strategies and the new directions that have emerged in U.S. policy in response to the new threat perceptions. Several of the books under review explore the deep socioeconomic and ideological origins of the wide support found in the U.S. public for the Bush administration’s bold and often controversial policy choices. Taken together, these works convey the impression that Bush’s strategic impulses will have considerable staying power in the U.S. body politic. KEYWORDS: Bush doctrine, terrorism/war on terrorism, grand strategy, terrorist threat, U.S. foreign policy. Richard A. Clarke, et al., Defeating the Jihadists: A Blueprint for Action (New York: Century Foundation Press, 2004), 172 pp. David Frum and Richard Perle, An End to Evil: How to Win the War on Terror (New York: Ballantine Books, 2004), 280 pp. John Lewis Gaddis, Surprise, Security, and the American Experience (Cambridge: Harvard

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 2005

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