Technological Diffusion or Cultural Imperialism?

Technological Diffusion or Cultural Imperialism? Technological Diffusion or Cultural Imperialism? Measuring the Information Revolution* R. ALAN HEDLEY** ABSTRACT The modern information revolution, dating from the 1970s, offers the possibility of a true "global village." However, it could also exacerbate existing cultural fault lines, particularly between North and South, and between English-speaking and non-English-speaking populations. I first conceptualize the multidimensional term "informationalization" and then measure its various dimensions among the G-7 nations. Three major results flow from the analysis. First, the information revolution is still very much in its beginning stages. Few workers are employed directly in computing, and revenues from the industry contribute only marginally to each country's economy. Although there is a sizeable information technology (IT) infrastructure in place within the G-7 nations, just a small fraction of the general populace actually uses computers, and fewer are connected to the Internet. Second, the information revolution is largely concentrated within the G-7 countries: only five of them account for over 80% of the IT market. Third, analysis of the Internet, the worldwide network of personal computers connected to host computers, reveals that it is overwhelmingly American-based, English-speaking, and Western-focused. Thus, the information revolution could presage the rapid and widespread transmission of information in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology) Brill

Technological Diffusion or Cultural Imperialism?

International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology) , Volume 39 (2): 198 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1998 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0020-7152
eISSN
1745-2554
D.O.I.
10.1163/002071598X00134
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Technological Diffusion or Cultural Imperialism? Measuring the Information Revolution* R. ALAN HEDLEY** ABSTRACT The modern information revolution, dating from the 1970s, offers the possibility of a true "global village." However, it could also exacerbate existing cultural fault lines, particularly between North and South, and between English-speaking and non-English-speaking populations. I first conceptualize the multidimensional term "informationalization" and then measure its various dimensions among the G-7 nations. Three major results flow from the analysis. First, the information revolution is still very much in its beginning stages. Few workers are employed directly in computing, and revenues from the industry contribute only marginally to each country's economy. Although there is a sizeable information technology (IT) infrastructure in place within the G-7 nations, just a small fraction of the general populace actually uses computers, and fewer are connected to the Internet. Second, the information revolution is largely concentrated within the G-7 countries: only five of them account for over 80% of the IT market. Third, analysis of the Internet, the worldwide network of personal computers connected to host computers, reveals that it is overwhelmingly American-based, English-speaking, and Western-focused. Thus, the information revolution could presage the rapid and widespread transmission of information in

Journal

International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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