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Sustainable Peace and Cooperation in Borderlands: The Danish–German Bonn–Copenhagen Declarations 1955–2005

Sustainable Peace and Cooperation in Borderlands: The Danish–German Bonn–Copenhagen Declarations... Jørgen Kühl* I. Introduction In , the Kingdom of Denmark and the Federal Republic of Germany celebrated the th anniversary of the so-called Bonn­Copenhagen Declarations on the status and rights of the national minorities in the Danish­German border region. The declarations were made public on March by the Federal German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, notifying the rights of the Danish community holding German citizenship in the state of Schleswig-Holstein (the Bonn Declaration), and by the Danish Prime Minister Hans Christian Hansen, notifying the rights of the German community holding Danish passports in the southern part of Jutland (the Copenhagen Declaration).1 Germany did not notify the status of the German community in Denmark or vice versa. The th anniversary of the declarations was celebrated at the official state level, by regional and local actors, and by the minorities concerned. Denmark and Germany issued identical postal stamps celebrating the anniversary.2 Numerous popular events and conferences took place. In the summer of , some young people from minorities and majorities from all over Europe met in the border region at a summer course called `Cultures in Dialogue', focusing on the minority declarations and their European significance.3 A special anniversary exhibition was produced http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

Sustainable Peace and Cooperation in Borderlands: The Danish–German Bonn–Copenhagen Declarations 1955–2005

European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online , Volume 5 (1): 117 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2007 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7865
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/22116117-90000039
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Jørgen Kühl* I. Introduction In , the Kingdom of Denmark and the Federal Republic of Germany celebrated the th anniversary of the so-called Bonn­Copenhagen Declarations on the status and rights of the national minorities in the Danish­German border region. The declarations were made public on March by the Federal German Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, notifying the rights of the Danish community holding German citizenship in the state of Schleswig-Holstein (the Bonn Declaration), and by the Danish Prime Minister Hans Christian Hansen, notifying the rights of the German community holding Danish passports in the southern part of Jutland (the Copenhagen Declaration).1 Germany did not notify the status of the German community in Denmark or vice versa. The th anniversary of the declarations was celebrated at the official state level, by regional and local actors, and by the minorities concerned. Denmark and Germany issued identical postal stamps celebrating the anniversary.2 Numerous popular events and conferences took place. In the summer of , some young people from minorities and majorities from all over Europe met in the border region at a summer course called `Cultures in Dialogue', focusing on the minority declarations and their European significance.3 A special anniversary exhibition was produced

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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