Support for a role of colour vision in mate choice in the nocturnal European treefrog (Hyla arborea)

Support for a role of colour vision in mate choice in the nocturnal European treefrog (Hyla arborea) Support for a role of colour vision in mate choice in the nocturnal European treefrog ( Hyla arborea ) Doris Gomez 1,3) , Christina Richardson 2) , Thierry Lengagne 2) , Maxime Derex 2) , Sandrine Plenet 2) , Pierre Joly 2) , Jean-Paul Léna 2) & Marc Théry 1) ( 1 CNRS UMR 7179, Muséum National d’Histoire naturelle, Département d’Ecologie et de Gestion de la Biodiversité, 1 avenue du petit château, 91800 Brunoy, France; 2 CNRS UMR 5023 Ecologie des Hydrosystèmes Fluviaux, Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 43 Bd du 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France) (Accepted: 15 September 2010) Summary Although nocturnal anurans use vision for reproductive communication, it remains unknown whether they see colours at night. Here, we explored this question in the European treefrog ( Hyla arborea ), by conducting two mate choice experiments under controlled light condi- tions. Experiments involved static male models with identical calls but different vocal sac colouration combining chromatic (red/orange) and brightness (dark/light) information. We found that females preferred dark red over light orange, evidencing for the first time a visually-guided mate choice in nocturnal diffuse light conditions. Conversely, females did not discriminate between dark orange and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Support for a role of colour vision in mate choice in the nocturnal European treefrog (Hyla arborea)

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2010 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
DOI
10.1163/000579510X534227
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Support for a role of colour vision in mate choice in the nocturnal European treefrog ( Hyla arborea ) Doris Gomez 1,3) , Christina Richardson 2) , Thierry Lengagne 2) , Maxime Derex 2) , Sandrine Plenet 2) , Pierre Joly 2) , Jean-Paul Léna 2) & Marc Théry 1) ( 1 CNRS UMR 7179, Muséum National d’Histoire naturelle, Département d’Ecologie et de Gestion de la Biodiversité, 1 avenue du petit château, 91800 Brunoy, France; 2 CNRS UMR 5023 Ecologie des Hydrosystèmes Fluviaux, Université Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 43 Bd du 11 novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex, France) (Accepted: 15 September 2010) Summary Although nocturnal anurans use vision for reproductive communication, it remains unknown whether they see colours at night. Here, we explored this question in the European treefrog ( Hyla arborea ), by conducting two mate choice experiments under controlled light condi- tions. Experiments involved static male models with identical calls but different vocal sac colouration combining chromatic (red/orange) and brightness (dark/light) information. We found that females preferred dark red over light orange, evidencing for the first time a visually-guided mate choice in nocturnal diffuse light conditions. Conversely, females did not discriminate between dark orange and

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2010

Keywords: COLOUR VISION; ROD; MATE CHOICE; NOCTURNAL ANURAN; BRIGHTNESS DETECTION

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