Subsidizing Sustainable Development under the WTO 1

Subsidizing Sustainable Development under the WTO 1 & INTRODUCTION In the face of increasing poverty, inequality, and environmental degradation across the world, the global community has reasserted the need for sustainable development through the Millennium Development Goals and at the World Summit for Sustainable Development. At the same time, most of the world's nations have also embarked on a new round of global trade negotiations-the Doha Round under the World Trade Organisation (WTO). Citing the fact that they gained very little from the Uruguay Round, developing countries agreed to enter a new round of trade negotiations only on the condition that development would be the centerpiece of the negotiations. There are growing concerns that this promise will go unfulfilled. A major concern is the notion that additional commitments will not give developing nations the "policy space" to use the very instruments and tools that many industrialized nations took advantage of to reach their current levels of development (Gallagher, 2005). This is of particular concern given that the estimated benefits of the Doha Round for developing countries are very limited. How, then, might developing countries' benefits be maximized in the context of W'ro negotiations? This paper addresses the need to preserve nations' ability to use subsidies http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of World Investment and Trade Brill

Subsidizing Sustainable Development under the WTO 1

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
Copyright 2009 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1660-7112
eISSN
2211-9000
D.O.I.
10.1163/221190009X00268
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

& INTRODUCTION In the face of increasing poverty, inequality, and environmental degradation across the world, the global community has reasserted the need for sustainable development through the Millennium Development Goals and at the World Summit for Sustainable Development. At the same time, most of the world's nations have also embarked on a new round of global trade negotiations-the Doha Round under the World Trade Organisation (WTO). Citing the fact that they gained very little from the Uruguay Round, developing countries agreed to enter a new round of trade negotiations only on the condition that development would be the centerpiece of the negotiations. There are growing concerns that this promise will go unfulfilled. A major concern is the notion that additional commitments will not give developing nations the "policy space" to use the very instruments and tools that many industrialized nations took advantage of to reach their current levels of development (Gallagher, 2005). This is of particular concern given that the estimated benefits of the Doha Round for developing countries are very limited. How, then, might developing countries' benefits be maximized in the context of W'ro negotiations? This paper addresses the need to preserve nations' ability to use subsidies

Journal

Journal of World Investment and TradeBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2009

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