STRUCTURE, GEOGRAPHY AND ORIGIN OF DIALECTS IN THE TRADITIVE SONG OF THE FOREST WEAVER PLOCEUS BICOLOR SCLATERI IN NATAL, S. AFRICA

STRUCTURE, GEOGRAPHY AND ORIGIN OF DIALECTS IN THE TRADITIVE SONG OF THE FOREST WEAVER PLOCEUS... STRUCTURE, GEOGRAPHY AND ORIGIN OF DIALECTS IN THE TRADITIVE SONG OF THE FOREST WEAVER PLOCEUS BICOLOR SCLATERI IN NATAL, S. AFRICA by UTA SEIBT , WOLFGANG WICKLER , HANS-ULRICH KLEINDIENST and EDITH SONNENSCHEIN 1) (Max-Planck-Institutfür VerhaltensphysiologieSeewiesen, D-82319 Starnberg) (Acc. 5-VIII-2002) Summary From a 21-year-long combined Ž eld and laboratory study we describe the general song structure and local song dialects of this species. These dialects differ in syntactic and phonological charateristics. Within its Ž rst 24 months the individual learns a song from its parents and keeps that song constant throughout life. In free-living populations dialects remained constant over the total study period. We could exclude that the dialects are an acoustic window phenomenon. We found individual song variations within dialects which suggest a derivation of local dialects from family-speciŽ c songs, enhanced by man-induced habitat fragmentation. Keywords : Forest weaver, Ž eld study, dialect, traditive song, human impact. Introduction The Forest weaver is arboreal, living in montane forest and bushveld, at home rather in the lianas below the canopy than in the tree-tops themselves (Sclater & Moreau, 1933; Skead, 1967). In South Africa it is bound to original 1) We thank the Natal Parks Board for permission http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

STRUCTURE, GEOGRAPHY AND ORIGIN OF DIALECTS IN THE TRADITIVE SONG OF THE FOREST WEAVER PLOCEUS BICOLOR SCLATERI IN NATAL, S. AFRICA

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2002 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/15685390260437362
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

STRUCTURE, GEOGRAPHY AND ORIGIN OF DIALECTS IN THE TRADITIVE SONG OF THE FOREST WEAVER PLOCEUS BICOLOR SCLATERI IN NATAL, S. AFRICA by UTA SEIBT , WOLFGANG WICKLER , HANS-ULRICH KLEINDIENST and EDITH SONNENSCHEIN 1) (Max-Planck-Institutfür VerhaltensphysiologieSeewiesen, D-82319 Starnberg) (Acc. 5-VIII-2002) Summary From a 21-year-long combined Ž eld and laboratory study we describe the general song structure and local song dialects of this species. These dialects differ in syntactic and phonological charateristics. Within its Ž rst 24 months the individual learns a song from its parents and keeps that song constant throughout life. In free-living populations dialects remained constant over the total study period. We could exclude that the dialects are an acoustic window phenomenon. We found individual song variations within dialects which suggest a derivation of local dialects from family-speciŽ c songs, enhanced by man-induced habitat fragmentation. Keywords : Forest weaver, Ž eld study, dialect, traditive song, human impact. Introduction The Forest weaver is arboreal, living in montane forest and bushveld, at home rather in the lianas below the canopy than in the tree-tops themselves (Sclater & Moreau, 1933; Skead, 1967). In South Africa it is bound to original 1) We thank the Natal Parks Board for permission

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2002

Keywords: human impact.; traditive song; dialect; Forest weaver; field study

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