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Strategic Approaches to Reintegration: Lessons Learned from Liberia

Strategic Approaches to Reintegration: Lessons Learned from Liberia Global Governance 16 (2010), 13–20 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Strategic Approaches to Reintegration: Lessons Learned from Liberia Andrea Tamagnini and Teresa Krafft SIX YEARS AFTER THE END OF THE LIBERIAN CONFLICT, EX-COMBATANTS are no longer considered a serious threat to peace and stability in Liberia. Sys- tematic surveys conducted by the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) show that there is no national network of ex-combatants, although local groups of ex-combatants still exist in some locations. From a security perspective, the reintegration of ex-combatants has been largely successful in Liberia. This good news is not a coincidence; it is due to six years of sustained effort to reestablish rule of law throughout the country, to rebuild institutions, to pro- mote early recovery, and to reintegrate the former fighting forces as well as other war-affected populations. The government, with support from the United Nations, many bilateral and multilateral partners, and national and interna- tional nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), has worked diligently to achieve this. This, however, does not mean that all problems related to reintegration are completely resolved. First, there are some persistent localized networks of ex- combatants. These networks often continue to exist for economic reasons as ex-combatant groups engage in a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Strategic Approaches to Reintegration: Lessons Learned from Liberia

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01601002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 16 (2010), 13–20 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Strategic Approaches to Reintegration: Lessons Learned from Liberia Andrea Tamagnini and Teresa Krafft SIX YEARS AFTER THE END OF THE LIBERIAN CONFLICT, EX-COMBATANTS are no longer considered a serious threat to peace and stability in Liberia. Sys- tematic surveys conducted by the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) show that there is no national network of ex-combatants, although local groups of ex-combatants still exist in some locations. From a security perspective, the reintegration of ex-combatants has been largely successful in Liberia. This good news is not a coincidence; it is due to six years of sustained effort to reestablish rule of law throughout the country, to rebuild institutions, to pro- mote early recovery, and to reintegrate the former fighting forces as well as other war-affected populations. The government, with support from the United Nations, many bilateral and multilateral partners, and national and interna- tional nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), has worked diligently to achieve this. This, however, does not mean that all problems related to reintegration are completely resolved. First, there are some persistent localized networks of ex- combatants. These networks often continue to exist for economic reasons as ex-combatant groups engage in a

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Dec 19, 2010

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