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Stone Tools in Human Evolution: Behavioral Differences among Technological Primates, written by John J. Shea

Stone Tools in Human Evolution: Behavioral Differences among Technological Primates, written by... Stone Tools in Human Evolution: Behavioral Differences among Technological Primates, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2017, 236 pp., isbn 9781107123090 (hardcover) / 9781107554931 (paperback), £64.99 hardcover. £22.99 paperbackIn Stone Tools in Human Evolution: Behavioral Differences among Technological Primates, John Shea employs a comparative analytical approach. He assesses how the evolution of behavior differs between humans and non-human primates to determine how we should classify the earliest period of tool production and use. Should the Palaeolithic be divided into industries, time successive units, or a single evolutionary sequence? This broad issue has vexed archaeologists since the Paleolithic was recognized and debated in the middle 19th-Century.Many non-human primates, such as common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and capuchin moneys (Cebus capucinus), make and use tools in the course of acquiring food. But, what these contemporary animals do is a far cry from what the behavior of the average human. In order to understand what is uniquely human, Shea develops a series of hypotheses and predictions about how hominin tool making and using strategies should have changed over time. He stresses that his volume is not a review of cultural evolution or even of stone tool analytical methods and theories. The author notes that the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

Stone Tools in Human Evolution: Behavioral Differences among Technological Primates, written by John J. Shea

Journal of African Archaeology , Volume 15 (2): 2 – Feb 14, 2017

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.1163/21915784-12340017
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Stone Tools in Human Evolution: Behavioral Differences among Technological Primates, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2017, 236 pp., isbn 9781107123090 (hardcover) / 9781107554931 (paperback), £64.99 hardcover. £22.99 paperbackIn Stone Tools in Human Evolution: Behavioral Differences among Technological Primates, John Shea employs a comparative analytical approach. He assesses how the evolution of behavior differs between humans and non-human primates to determine how we should classify the earliest period of tool production and use. Should the Palaeolithic be divided into industries, time successive units, or a single evolutionary sequence? This broad issue has vexed archaeologists since the Paleolithic was recognized and debated in the middle 19th-Century.Many non-human primates, such as common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and capuchin moneys (Cebus capucinus), make and use tools in the course of acquiring food. But, what these contemporary animals do is a far cry from what the behavior of the average human. In order to understand what is uniquely human, Shea develops a series of hypotheses and predictions about how hominin tool making and using strategies should have changed over time. He stresses that his volume is not a review of cultural evolution or even of stone tool analytical methods and theories. The author notes that the

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Feb 14, 2017

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