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Sovereignty and International Security: Challenges for the United Nations

Sovereignty and International Security: Challenges for the United Nations Global Governance 2 (1996), 149-168 Sovereignty and International Security: Challenges for the United Nations Samuel M. Makinda n the past few years, the UN has authorized or undertaken the deploy­ I ment of forces in at least three member states without the permission of the governments of those countries: Haiti, northern Iraq, and Soma­ lia. Unlike the traditional peacekeeping operations that are impartial, re­ quire the consent of the parties, and refrain from the use of force except in extreme circumstances, these deployments constituted enforcement or war-fighting operations.! As enforcement operations always overlook the principle of consent, they are essentially interventionist forces, where in­ tervention is defined as an attempt to get involved, or deploy military force, in a conflict without the approval of all the parties to the conflict. These interventions appear to have set important legal precedents that could influence the evolution of the international system. Recent comments by analysts and policymakers suggest that these UN actions are indicative of international opinion that is gradually moving to­ ward a reinterpretation of state sovereignty. For example, a recent report of the Commission on Global Governance, which was a cross section of representatives from five continents, stated: "When there http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Sovereignty and International Security: Challenges for the United Nations

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-002-02-90000002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 2 (1996), 149-168 Sovereignty and International Security: Challenges for the United Nations Samuel M. Makinda n the past few years, the UN has authorized or undertaken the deploy­ I ment of forces in at least three member states without the permission of the governments of those countries: Haiti, northern Iraq, and Soma­ lia. Unlike the traditional peacekeeping operations that are impartial, re­ quire the consent of the parties, and refrain from the use of force except in extreme circumstances, these deployments constituted enforcement or war-fighting operations.! As enforcement operations always overlook the principle of consent, they are essentially interventionist forces, where in­ tervention is defined as an attempt to get involved, or deploy military force, in a conflict without the approval of all the parties to the conflict. These interventions appear to have set important legal precedents that could influence the evolution of the international system. Recent comments by analysts and policymakers suggest that these UN actions are indicative of international opinion that is gradually moving to­ ward a reinterpretation of state sovereignty. For example, a recent report of the Commission on Global Governance, which was a cross section of representatives from five continents, stated: "When there

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Jul 19, 1996

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