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South Africa and Abusive Regimes at the UN Human Rights Council

South Africa and Abusive Regimes at the UN Human Rights Council Global Governance 20 (2014), 233–254 South Africa and Abusive Regimes at the UN Human Rights Council Eduard Jordaan There is some dispute over the extent to which South Africa has become a defender of regimes that abuse human rights. This article sheds further light on this question by focusing on South Africa’s positions during the UN Human Rights Council’s engagement with human rights problems in six countries: Democratic Republic of Congo, Israel, North Korea, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, and Sudan. In five of the six chosen cases, South Africa’s attitude ranged from reluctant to obstructive of efforts to defend human rights. In only one case—Israel—was South Africa willing to bring to bear the full weight of the council’s power. These findings strengthen the argument that South Africa is prone to shielding regimes that abuse human rights. KEYWORDS: UN Human Rights Council, South African human rights. UPON DEMOCRATIZATION, NELSON MANDELA ANNOUNCED THAT HUMAN RIGHTS would be the light to guide South Africa’s foreign policy, but this commit- ment soon yielded to the need for a pragmatic foreign policy. As Mandela’s successor Thabo Mbeki came to direct foreign policy, South Africa’s associ- ation with Africa became stronger, international economic links more impor- http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

South Africa and Abusive Regimes at the UN Human Rights Council

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-02002005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 20 (2014), 233–254 South Africa and Abusive Regimes at the UN Human Rights Council Eduard Jordaan There is some dispute over the extent to which South Africa has become a defender of regimes that abuse human rights. This article sheds further light on this question by focusing on South Africa’s positions during the UN Human Rights Council’s engagement with human rights problems in six countries: Democratic Republic of Congo, Israel, North Korea, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, and Sudan. In five of the six chosen cases, South Africa’s attitude ranged from reluctant to obstructive of efforts to defend human rights. In only one case—Israel—was South Africa willing to bring to bear the full weight of the council’s power. These findings strengthen the argument that South Africa is prone to shielding regimes that abuse human rights. KEYWORDS: UN Human Rights Council, South African human rights. UPON DEMOCRATIZATION, NELSON MANDELA ANNOUNCED THAT HUMAN RIGHTS would be the light to guide South Africa’s foreign policy, but this commit- ment soon yielded to the need for a pragmatic foreign policy. As Mandela’s successor Thabo Mbeki came to direct foreign policy, South Africa’s associ- ation with Africa became stronger, international economic links more impor-

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2014

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