Sources of variation in the long-distance vocalizations of spotted hyenas

Sources of variation in the long-distance vocalizations of spotted hyenas Sources of variation in the long-distance vocalizations of spotted hyenas Kevin R. Theis 1) , Keron M. Greene , Sarah R. Benson-Amram & Kay E. Holekamp (Department of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1115, USA) (Accepted: 26 March 2007) Summary It has long been recognized that vocal signals communicate information about the age, sex and affective state of callers. However, the mechanisms by which these types of information are communicated are less well understood. Here we investigated variation in the acoustic properties of the long-distance vocalizations, called ‘whoops’, emitted by free-living spotted hyenas, Crocuta crocuta . Specifically we investigated whether the fundamental frequency, length and rate of whoops provide information about the caller’s age, sex and/or level of arousal. We determined the latter by contrasting whoops emitted spontaneously with whoops emitted during periods of social excitement, when callers typically also exhibited visual sig- nals associated with heightened arousal. We found that the minimum fundamental frequency of a whoop provides reliable information about the caller’s general age and, for adult callers, information about sex as well. The vast majority of adult male whoop bouts were emitted spontaneously, but juveniles and adult females produced many of their bouts http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Sources of variation in the long-distance vocalizations of spotted hyenas

Behaviour, Volume 144 (5): 557 – Jan 1, 2007

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2007 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853907780713046
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Sources of variation in the long-distance vocalizations of spotted hyenas Kevin R. Theis 1) , Keron M. Greene , Sarah R. Benson-Amram & Kay E. Holekamp (Department of Zoology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1115, USA) (Accepted: 26 March 2007) Summary It has long been recognized that vocal signals communicate information about the age, sex and affective state of callers. However, the mechanisms by which these types of information are communicated are less well understood. Here we investigated variation in the acoustic properties of the long-distance vocalizations, called ‘whoops’, emitted by free-living spotted hyenas, Crocuta crocuta . Specifically we investigated whether the fundamental frequency, length and rate of whoops provide information about the caller’s age, sex and/or level of arousal. We determined the latter by contrasting whoops emitted spontaneously with whoops emitted during periods of social excitement, when callers typically also exhibited visual sig- nals associated with heightened arousal. We found that the minimum fundamental frequency of a whoop provides reliable information about the caller’s general age and, for adult callers, information about sex as well. The vast majority of adult male whoop bouts were emitted spontaneously, but juveniles and adult females produced many of their bouts

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

Keywords: CROCUTA CROCUTA; AFFERENT SIGNALING; FISSION-FUSION; VOCAL COMMUNICATION; AROUSAL

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