Sound Transmission: a Basis for Dialects in Birdsong?

Sound Transmission: a Basis for Dialects in Birdsong? SOUND TRANSMISSION: A BASIS FOR DIALECTS IN BIRDSONG? by E. M. DATE1) and R. E. LEMON2) (Department of Biology, McGill University, Montreal, P.Q. Canada, H3A 1B1) (With 6 Figures) (Acc. 16-III-1993) Summary The environmental adaptation hypothesis (EAH) regarding birdsong dialects or ncighbour- hoods states that song similarities between neighbouring individuals arise because of common influences on their songs exerted by the acoustic environment of their habitat. An assumption of the hypothesis is that sounds are distorted differently by different types of habitat. A prediction of the hypothesis is that some songs or parts of songs transmit better than others, depending on the habitat of their origin. We tested the assumption and prediction by comparing the attenuation and differential attenuation of pure tones, decreases in modal frequencies of computer simulated songs of American redstarts (Setophaga ruticilla), and the decay of redstart songs and white noise at deciduous, coniferous and open forest sites. The songs were representative of those used by redstarts living in thc three habitats. Results supported the assumption of acoustic differences between habitats but did not support the prediction that some songtypes transmit with less distortion in specific habitats than in others. The EAH also predicts that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Sound Transmission: a Basis for Dialects in Birdsong?

Behaviour, Volume 124 (3-4): 291 – Jan 1, 1993

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1993 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853993X00623
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SOUND TRANSMISSION: A BASIS FOR DIALECTS IN BIRDSONG? by E. M. DATE1) and R. E. LEMON2) (Department of Biology, McGill University, Montreal, P.Q. Canada, H3A 1B1) (With 6 Figures) (Acc. 16-III-1993) Summary The environmental adaptation hypothesis (EAH) regarding birdsong dialects or ncighbour- hoods states that song similarities between neighbouring individuals arise because of common influences on their songs exerted by the acoustic environment of their habitat. An assumption of the hypothesis is that sounds are distorted differently by different types of habitat. A prediction of the hypothesis is that some songs or parts of songs transmit better than others, depending on the habitat of their origin. We tested the assumption and prediction by comparing the attenuation and differential attenuation of pure tones, decreases in modal frequencies of computer simulated songs of American redstarts (Setophaga ruticilla), and the decay of redstart songs and white noise at deciduous, coniferous and open forest sites. The songs were representative of those used by redstarts living in thc three habitats. Results supported the assumption of acoustic differences between habitats but did not support the prediction that some songtypes transmit with less distortion in specific habitats than in others. The EAH also predicts that

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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