SOME OF THE DEEP-SEA FAUNA IS ANCIENT

SOME OF THE DEEP-SEA FAUNA IS ANCIENT Jan H. Stock Memorial Issue SOME OF THE DEEP-SEA FAUNA IS ANCIENT BY GEORGE D. F. WILSON Centre for Evolutionary Research, Australian Museum, 6 College Street, Sydney, NSW 2000, Australia ABSTRACT Decreasing deep-sea ¯ oor temperatures during the mid Cainozoic, and a presumed widespread disoxia in the deep sea prior to this era has lead many authors to suggest that the deep-sea fauna has accumulated during the last 30-40 mybp only. This hypothesis argues for extinction and replace- ment of earlier faunas. Some taxa, such as the Ostracoda, show extensive taxonomic replacement during the Miocene that is correlated with declining sea ¯ oor temperatures. A recent evaluation of the deep Atlantic distribution of major isopod clades, however, demonstrated that two different historical patterns are present. One pattern ( ª Flabellifera º ) conforms to a relatively recent Caino- zoic and ongoing colonization of the deep sea, with relative impoverishment of species with depth. The other pattern (Asellota) is one that is rich in deep-sea species, and has a high level of endemic morphological diversity, suggesting a long period of evolution in isolation. Glaciation during the late Palaeozoic and an early phylogenetic origination of the Asellota support the hypothesis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crustaceana Brill

SOME OF THE DEEP-SEA FAUNA IS ANCIENT

Crustaceana, Volume 72 (8): 1019 – Jan 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/some-of-the-deep-sea-fauna-is-ancient-M2594n2ZDr
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1999 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0011-216x
eISSN
1568-5403
D.O.I.
10.1163/156854099503915
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Jan H. Stock Memorial Issue SOME OF THE DEEP-SEA FAUNA IS ANCIENT BY GEORGE D. F. WILSON Centre for Evolutionary Research, Australian Museum, 6 College Street, Sydney, NSW 2000, Australia ABSTRACT Decreasing deep-sea ¯ oor temperatures during the mid Cainozoic, and a presumed widespread disoxia in the deep sea prior to this era has lead many authors to suggest that the deep-sea fauna has accumulated during the last 30-40 mybp only. This hypothesis argues for extinction and replace- ment of earlier faunas. Some taxa, such as the Ostracoda, show extensive taxonomic replacement during the Miocene that is correlated with declining sea ¯ oor temperatures. A recent evaluation of the deep Atlantic distribution of major isopod clades, however, demonstrated that two different historical patterns are present. One pattern ( ª Flabellifera º ) conforms to a relatively recent Caino- zoic and ongoing colonization of the deep sea, with relative impoverishment of species with depth. The other pattern (Asellota) is one that is rich in deep-sea species, and has a high level of endemic morphological diversity, suggesting a long period of evolution in isolation. Glaciation during the late Palaeozoic and an early phylogenetic origination of the Asellota support the hypothesis

Journal

CrustaceanaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1999

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off