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Socrates Meets Carnap

Socrates Meets Carnap Explication in the Theaetetus Katarzyna Paprzycka, University of Southern Mississippi In the first third of the Theaetetus , Socrates delivers Theaetetus of his first offspring, the hypothesis that knowledge is perception. Before refuting the claim, Socrates develops it into a full-blown theory. He first uses Protagoras’ epistemology and then Heraclitus’ metaphysics to this end. My main purpose is to look at what Socrates does from a broadly conceived methodological stand- point. It may be tempting to think that Socrates finds smooth logical transitions between the three theories. Myles Burnyeat suggests that we think of Theae- tetus’ thesis as being implied by Protagoras’ theory, and that in turn as being implied by Heraclitus’ metaphysics. Moreover, aside from providing sufficient conditions for Theaetetus’ thesis, Burnyeat believes that Plato takes the theories to be the only sufficient conditions and so as providing necessary conditions as well. Indeed such an understanding may be suggested by Socrates’ saying of the theories that they “coincide” (160d). But this cannot be true. On the above hypothesis, the Heraclitean theory would imply Theaetetus’ thesis. This is easily shown not to be the case. In drawing the “coinciding” relations between Theaetetus’ thesis that perception is knowledge and Protagoras’ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Philosophy and Logical Analysis Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2666-4283
eISSN
2666-4275
DOI
10.30965/26664275-00201008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Explication in the Theaetetus Katarzyna Paprzycka, University of Southern Mississippi In the first third of the Theaetetus , Socrates delivers Theaetetus of his first offspring, the hypothesis that knowledge is perception. Before refuting the claim, Socrates develops it into a full-blown theory. He first uses Protagoras’ epistemology and then Heraclitus’ metaphysics to this end. My main purpose is to look at what Socrates does from a broadly conceived methodological stand- point. It may be tempting to think that Socrates finds smooth logical transitions between the three theories. Myles Burnyeat suggests that we think of Theae- tetus’ thesis as being implied by Protagoras’ theory, and that in turn as being implied by Heraclitus’ metaphysics. Moreover, aside from providing sufficient conditions for Theaetetus’ thesis, Burnyeat believes that Plato takes the theories to be the only sufficient conditions and so as providing necessary conditions as well. Indeed such an understanding may be suggested by Socrates’ saying of the theories that they “coincide” (160d). But this cannot be true. On the above hypothesis, the Heraclitean theory would imply Theaetetus’ thesis. This is easily shown not to be the case. In drawing the “coinciding” relations between Theaetetus’ thesis that perception is knowledge and Protagoras’

Journal

History of Philosophy and Logical AnalysisBrill

Published: Apr 5, 1999

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