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Silva Barris, J. 2011. Metre and Rhythm in Greek Verse . Vienna, Austrian Academy of Sciences. 177 pp. Pr. 39.20 euros. ISBN 978-3-7001-6902-4

Silva Barris, J. 2011. Metre and Rhythm in Greek Verse . Vienna, Austrian Academy of Sciences.... Despite Paul Maas’ renowned skepticism, Joan Silva Barris sets out in this book to show how the musical rhythms of ancient Greek poetry can be recaptured. We are reminded of the resources we can resort to, if we aim at appreciating the metrical-rhythmical reality of poetic texts from a musical standpoint. There is first an abundant corpus of ancient doctrine regarding the theoretical treatment of meters and rhythms, well-known passages taken from Plato, Aristotle and Aristoxenus, up to Hephaestion and Aristides Quintilianus. Secondly, there is the musical evidence, both instrumental and vocal. Thirdly, comparison with other musical cultures might in some cases offer enlightening suggestions. This multifaceted and unfamiliar subject is divided by the author into three parts. The first part ( Relative Basic Durations and Syllabic Equivalences , 13-55) illustrates how most of ancient Greek theory is applicable to the metrics of archaic and classical texts. SB observes that all rhythmic genres, whether recited or sung, are studied by ancient theory using analogous assumptions, and it is never indicated that the doctrine ought to be applied in a different manner depending on the performance-practices associated with each genre. It therefore seems acceptable to approach sung and recited http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Greek and Roman Musical Studies Brill

Silva Barris, J. 2011. Metre and Rhythm in Greek Verse . Vienna, Austrian Academy of Sciences. 177 pp. Pr. 39.20 euros. ISBN 978-3-7001-6902-4

Greek and Roman Musical Studies , Volume 1 (1): 258 – Jan 1, 2013

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Book Reviews
ISSN
2212-974X
eISSN
2212-9758
DOI
10.1163/22129758-12341248
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Despite Paul Maas’ renowned skepticism, Joan Silva Barris sets out in this book to show how the musical rhythms of ancient Greek poetry can be recaptured. We are reminded of the resources we can resort to, if we aim at appreciating the metrical-rhythmical reality of poetic texts from a musical standpoint. There is first an abundant corpus of ancient doctrine regarding the theoretical treatment of meters and rhythms, well-known passages taken from Plato, Aristotle and Aristoxenus, up to Hephaestion and Aristides Quintilianus. Secondly, there is the musical evidence, both instrumental and vocal. Thirdly, comparison with other musical cultures might in some cases offer enlightening suggestions. This multifaceted and unfamiliar subject is divided by the author into three parts. The first part ( Relative Basic Durations and Syllabic Equivalences , 13-55) illustrates how most of ancient Greek theory is applicable to the metrics of archaic and classical texts. SB observes that all rhythmic genres, whether recited or sung, are studied by ancient theory using analogous assumptions, and it is never indicated that the doctrine ought to be applied in a different manner depending on the performance-practices associated with each genre. It therefore seems acceptable to approach sung and recited

Journal

Greek and Roman Musical StudiesBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2013

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