Silent Shouts: Michael Arcega’s Code-Switching

Silent Shouts: Michael Arcega’s Code-Switching As of late 2015, approximately 460,000 migrant workers (mostly hailing from the Philippines and South Asia) have landed in Bahrain, a tiny island nation in the Persian Gulf that remains an important ally to the us and Saudi Arabia.1Protected by both nations for sometimes contradictory geopolitical factors—its strategic location allows for us Navy ships to be stationed near Afghanistan and other frontiers of the ongoing Gulf Wars, and its oil reserves are precious to the Saudi elites—Bahrain today imagines itself as a more welcoming haven for migrant workers than its neighbours, even as it has failed to enforce labour laws and has left grievous abuses of workers unaddressed. Those who have dared to protest human rights violations have been spectacularly punished, as they were during the Arab Spring of 2011, when Bahrain’s revolutionary Shiite Muslim majority was violently suppressed with the financial and military backing of its biggest allies. More recently, in January 2016, Bahraini activist Nabeel Rajab was sentenced to six months in prison for posting a Tweet critical of the monarchy, demonstrating the continued silencing of dissenting voices.2In this charged political landscape, how does an artist working from within Bahrain’s borders speak back to power?For Filipino American http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the Americas Brill

Silent Shouts: Michael Arcega’s Code-Switching

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/silent-shouts-michael-arcega-s-code-switching-DKk7iLduvE
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2352-3077
eISSN
2352-3085
D.O.I.
10.1163/23523085-00302010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

As of late 2015, approximately 460,000 migrant workers (mostly hailing from the Philippines and South Asia) have landed in Bahrain, a tiny island nation in the Persian Gulf that remains an important ally to the us and Saudi Arabia.1Protected by both nations for sometimes contradictory geopolitical factors—its strategic location allows for us Navy ships to be stationed near Afghanistan and other frontiers of the ongoing Gulf Wars, and its oil reserves are precious to the Saudi elites—Bahrain today imagines itself as a more welcoming haven for migrant workers than its neighbours, even as it has failed to enforce labour laws and has left grievous abuses of workers unaddressed. Those who have dared to protest human rights violations have been spectacularly punished, as they were during the Arab Spring of 2011, when Bahrain’s revolutionary Shiite Muslim majority was violently suppressed with the financial and military backing of its biggest allies. More recently, in January 2016, Bahraini activist Nabeel Rajab was sentenced to six months in prison for posting a Tweet critical of the monarchy, demonstrating the continued silencing of dissenting voices.2In this charged political landscape, how does an artist working from within Bahrain’s borders speak back to power?For Filipino American

Journal

Asian Diasporic Visual Cultures and the AmericasBrill

Published: Mar 14, 2017

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off