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Silence : An Intentional Analysis

Silence : An Intentional Analysis 63 Silence : An Intentional Analysis BERNARD P. DAUENHAUER University of Georgia Silence is a peculiar, complex phenomenon. It is, on the one hand, ob- viously connected with expression, either verbal, musical, or gestural. But, on the other hand, it is not itself such an expression. It is obviously a com- mon component of the web of human experience. But its weight, worth, or sense is by no means obvious. Sometimes the phenomenon of silence is simply ignored. Sometimes it is noticed but is considered negligible. But sometimes it is taken to be a human achievement of capital importance. In an earlier essay,' I argued that silence is a positive phenomenon, dis- tinct from "keeping silence," which has a number of profiles. I identified and described three of these profiles: 1) Intervening silence, the silence which punctuates the components of a verbal, musical, or gestural expres- sion ; 2) Fore-and-after silence, the fringe of silence which immediately precedes the first phrase of an expression and which immediately follows its last phrase; and 3) Deep silence, the silence which pervades expression but which is not directly correlated with any specific expression. Though these profiles are not the only profiles http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Silence : An Intentional Analysis

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 6 (1): 63 – Jan 1, 1976

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1976 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916476X00041
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

63 Silence : An Intentional Analysis BERNARD P. DAUENHAUER University of Georgia Silence is a peculiar, complex phenomenon. It is, on the one hand, ob- viously connected with expression, either verbal, musical, or gestural. But, on the other hand, it is not itself such an expression. It is obviously a com- mon component of the web of human experience. But its weight, worth, or sense is by no means obvious. Sometimes the phenomenon of silence is simply ignored. Sometimes it is noticed but is considered negligible. But sometimes it is taken to be a human achievement of capital importance. In an earlier essay,' I argued that silence is a positive phenomenon, dis- tinct from "keeping silence," which has a number of profiles. I identified and described three of these profiles: 1) Intervening silence, the silence which punctuates the components of a verbal, musical, or gestural expres- sion ; 2) Fore-and-after silence, the fringe of silence which immediately precedes the first phrase of an expression and which immediately follows its last phrase; and 3) Deep silence, the silence which pervades expression but which is not directly correlated with any specific expression. Though these profiles are not the only profiles

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1976

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