Short-range limitation on detection of feature differences

Short-range limitation on detection of feature differences Short-range limitation on detection of feature differences DOV SAGI1 and BELA JULESZ2 1The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel and 2AT & T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974, USA Received 15 January 1986; revised 10 June 1986; accepted 2 July 1986 Abstract- We studied the ability of observers to detect the presence of a clearly visible line segment against a background of line segments of different orientation. As we increase the number (density) of these background lines, we find that detectability does not behave monotonically. Adding a small number of background lines decreases detectability but if adjacent line segments are permitted to fall in close range, a further increase of background lines improves performance which eventually reaches a constant level. This suggests that detection of feature differences involves a short-range process. The range of this process is about two degrees or twice the length of the line segments used. Thus texture-gradients between different elements are only formed if the distance between these elements is not much larger than the average element size. INTRODUCTION Recent theories of vision suggest that human vision operates in two modes, one is preattentive and the other is attentive. The first is http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010) Brill

Short-range limitation on detection of feature differences

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1987 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0169-1015
eISSN
1568-5683
DOI
10.1163/156856887X00042
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Short-range limitation on detection of feature differences DOV SAGI1 and BELA JULESZ2 1The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel and 2AT & T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974, USA Received 15 January 1986; revised 10 June 1986; accepted 2 July 1986 Abstract- We studied the ability of observers to detect the presence of a clearly visible line segment against a background of line segments of different orientation. As we increase the number (density) of these background lines, we find that detectability does not behave monotonically. Adding a small number of background lines decreases detectability but if adjacent line segments are permitted to fall in close range, a further increase of background lines improves performance which eventually reaches a constant level. This suggests that detection of feature differences involves a short-range process. The range of this process is about two degrees or twice the length of the line segments used. Thus texture-gradients between different elements are only formed if the distance between these elements is not much larger than the average element size. INTRODUCTION Recent theories of vision suggest that human vision operates in two modes, one is preattentive and the other is attentive. The first is

Journal

Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1987

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