Shape information from shading: A theory about human perception

Shape information from shading: A theory about human perception Shape information from shading: A theory about human perception ALEX PENTLAND Vision Sciences Group, E15-410, The Media Lab, MIT, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA Received for publication 1 July 1989 Abstract-I present evidence that people assume a simple, linear reflectance function when interpreting shading information. Using this reflectance function I derive a closed-form solution to the problem of extracting shape information from image shading. The solution does not employ an assumption about surface smoothness and so is directly applicable to complex natural surfaces such as hair or cloth. A simple biological mechanism is proposed to implement this recovery of shape. It is shown that this simple mechanism can also extract significant shape information from line drawings. Shading appears to me to be of supreme importance in perspective, because without it opaque and solid bodies will be ill-defined.... Leonardo Da Vinci, Notebooks 1. INTRODUCTION People's ability to extract shape from shading is well known (Pentland, 1982a; Todd and Mingolla, 1983; Bulthoff and Mallot, 1987); however, relatively little research has gone into determining what simplifying assumptions people might be employing. There is good reason to expect that such assumptions are critical to this task, as without them the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010) Brill

Shape information from shading: A theory about human perception

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1989 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0169-1015
eISSN
1568-5683
DOI
10.1163/156856889X00103
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Shape information from shading: A theory about human perception ALEX PENTLAND Vision Sciences Group, E15-410, The Media Lab, MIT, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA Received for publication 1 July 1989 Abstract-I present evidence that people assume a simple, linear reflectance function when interpreting shading information. Using this reflectance function I derive a closed-form solution to the problem of extracting shape information from image shading. The solution does not employ an assumption about surface smoothness and so is directly applicable to complex natural surfaces such as hair or cloth. A simple biological mechanism is proposed to implement this recovery of shape. It is shown that this simple mechanism can also extract significant shape information from line drawings. Shading appears to me to be of supreme importance in perspective, because without it opaque and solid bodies will be ill-defined.... Leonardo Da Vinci, Notebooks 1. INTRODUCTION People's ability to extract shape from shading is well known (Pentland, 1982a; Todd and Mingolla, 1983; Bulthoff and Mallot, 1987); however, relatively little research has gone into determining what simplifying assumptions people might be employing. There is good reason to expect that such assumptions are critical to this task, as without them the

Journal

Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1989

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