Sex Differences in Affective-Social Responses of Rhesus Monkeys

Sex Differences in Affective-Social Responses of Rhesus Monkeys SEX DIFFERENCES IN AFFECTIVE-SOCIAL RESPONSES OF RHESUS MONKEYS by WILLIAM A. MASON 1), PHILIP C. GREEN, AND CAROL J. POSEPANKO 2) (University of Wisconsin) (With 4 Figs) (Rec. 1-VIII-1959) Naturalistic accounts of macaque monkeys have provided descriptions of the fundamental role of species-specific vocalizations, gestures, and stereo- typed response patterns in the initiation and coordination of social interactions. Despite fundamental similarities between the sexes in the form of these res ponses, the studies of CARPENTER (1942a; 1942b) and CHANCE (1956) clearly suggest multiple differences between adult males and females in the incidence. patterning, and social functions of these stereotyped behaviors. It is reasona- ble to assume that these differences reflect fundamental response characteris- tics, probably dependent upon constitutional factors, even though they are doubtless influenced by individual histories and the immediate social situation. We have observed that captive female rhesus monkeys are characteristi- cally more excitable than males as evidenced by more frequent and intense displays of stereotyped fear responses or aggressive reactions. Insofar as com- parable data are available, these observations are consistent with descriptions provided by field workers (CARPENTER, 1942a; CHANCE, 1956), but there have been no experimental investigations of these stereotyped behaviors and their relation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Sex Differences in Affective-Social Responses of Rhesus Monkeys

Behaviour, Volume 16 (1-2): 74 – Jan 1, 1960

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1960 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853960X00043
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SEX DIFFERENCES IN AFFECTIVE-SOCIAL RESPONSES OF RHESUS MONKEYS by WILLIAM A. MASON 1), PHILIP C. GREEN, AND CAROL J. POSEPANKO 2) (University of Wisconsin) (With 4 Figs) (Rec. 1-VIII-1959) Naturalistic accounts of macaque monkeys have provided descriptions of the fundamental role of species-specific vocalizations, gestures, and stereo- typed response patterns in the initiation and coordination of social interactions. Despite fundamental similarities between the sexes in the form of these res ponses, the studies of CARPENTER (1942a; 1942b) and CHANCE (1956) clearly suggest multiple differences between adult males and females in the incidence. patterning, and social functions of these stereotyped behaviors. It is reasona- ble to assume that these differences reflect fundamental response characteris- tics, probably dependent upon constitutional factors, even though they are doubtless influenced by individual histories and the immediate social situation. We have observed that captive female rhesus monkeys are characteristi- cally more excitable than males as evidenced by more frequent and intense displays of stereotyped fear responses or aggressive reactions. Insofar as com- parable data are available, these observations are consistent with descriptions provided by field workers (CARPENTER, 1942a; CHANCE, 1956), but there have been no experimental investigations of these stereotyped behaviors and their relation

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1960

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