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Serbia: Minorities in a Reluctant State

Serbia: Minorities in a Reluctant State Florian Bieber* I. Introduction Over the past few years, Serbia's quest for greater stability has been largely unsuccessful. As an unconsolidated democracy with a large anti-democratic and anti-reform opposition and a number of open status and territorial issues, reforms and majority­minority relations have been rocky. The assassination of Prime Minister Zoran Djindji is often viewed as a watershed between the more optimistic and reformist Serbia of the first post-Milosevi years and the cautious and conservative Serbia since, epitomized by Vojislav Kostunica, who was elected prime minister in early . While such a dichotomy might oversimplify the complexities of the transition process in Serbia, recent years have been shaped by a high level of support for the Serb Radical Party (Srpska radikalna stranka, SRS), a rise of attacks by extremist groups against minorities and political opponents and the dominance of the Kosovo issue on the political agenda. Minorities in Serbia today find themselves in a `reluctant state'. Although the authorities have engaged in state-building in recent years, from symbolic acts such as adopting a new flag and hymn to the new constitution, the key open status questions for Serbia appear to be imposed from outside, be it the referendum http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

Serbia: Minorities in a Reluctant State

European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online , Volume 5 (1): 243 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2007 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7865
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/22116117-90000047
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Florian Bieber* I. Introduction Over the past few years, Serbia's quest for greater stability has been largely unsuccessful. As an unconsolidated democracy with a large anti-democratic and anti-reform opposition and a number of open status and territorial issues, reforms and majority­minority relations have been rocky. The assassination of Prime Minister Zoran Djindji is often viewed as a watershed between the more optimistic and reformist Serbia of the first post-Milosevi years and the cautious and conservative Serbia since, epitomized by Vojislav Kostunica, who was elected prime minister in early . While such a dichotomy might oversimplify the complexities of the transition process in Serbia, recent years have been shaped by a high level of support for the Serb Radical Party (Srpska radikalna stranka, SRS), a rise of attacks by extremist groups against minorities and political opponents and the dominance of the Kosovo issue on the political agenda. Minorities in Serbia today find themselves in a `reluctant state'. Although the authorities have engaged in state-building in recent years, from symbolic acts such as adopting a new flag and hymn to the new constitution, the key open status questions for Serbia appear to be imposed from outside, be it the referendum

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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