Seminar: Host and Plant Temperature Effects On Nematode Development Rates and Nematode Ecology

Seminar: Host and Plant Temperature Effects On Nematode Development Rates and Nematode Ecology SEMINAR: HOST AND PLANT TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON NEMATODE DEVELOPMENT RATES AND NEMATODE ECOLOGY BY D. L. TRUDGILL Scottish Crop Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee DD2 5DA, Scotland Ferris (1993), in a colloquium paper, eloquently addressed many of the problems and prospects for research on nematode ecology. He questioned whether nematology was sufficiently involved in and interactive with mainstream ecology in other areas and suggested that nematology was relatively isolated. He further implied that too much of the work is observational, involves the gathering of facts and that the development and testing of hypotheses was being neglected. He stressed the need for the continued development of a theoretical basis from which to develop hypotheses. However, this is easier said than done as referees and journals are often not very sympathetic of papers which are short on facts and long on ideas. But, I suggest we often have a surfeit of the former and a shortage of the latter. It is evident that nematodes have enormous potential in ecological studies. They are relatively sedentary and therefore their population and species structure reflects both historical and current events; some species are strong "indicators" (e.g. host specific cyst nematode species; also species with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nematologica Brill

Seminar: Host and Plant Temperature Effects On Nematode Development Rates and Nematode Ecology

Nematologica, Volume 41 (1-4): 398 – Jan 1, 1995

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/seminar-host-and-plant-temperature-effects-on-nematode-development-QOvZXN3OHe
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1995 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0028-2596
eISSN
1875-2926
D.O.I.
10.1163/003925995X00369
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SEMINAR: HOST AND PLANT TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON NEMATODE DEVELOPMENT RATES AND NEMATODE ECOLOGY BY D. L. TRUDGILL Scottish Crop Research Institute, Invergowrie, Dundee DD2 5DA, Scotland Ferris (1993), in a colloquium paper, eloquently addressed many of the problems and prospects for research on nematode ecology. He questioned whether nematology was sufficiently involved in and interactive with mainstream ecology in other areas and suggested that nematology was relatively isolated. He further implied that too much of the work is observational, involves the gathering of facts and that the development and testing of hypotheses was being neglected. He stressed the need for the continued development of a theoretical basis from which to develop hypotheses. However, this is easier said than done as referees and journals are often not very sympathetic of papers which are short on facts and long on ideas. But, I suggest we often have a surfeit of the former and a shortage of the latter. It is evident that nematodes have enormous potential in ecological studies. They are relatively sedentary and therefore their population and species structure reflects both historical and current events; some species are strong "indicators" (e.g. host specific cyst nematode species; also species with

Journal

NematologicaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1995

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off