Self-Government and Natural Resources - The Faroese Case I

Self-Government and Natural Resources - The Faroese Case I 338 Self-Government and Natural Resources - The Faroese Case I By Halgir Winther Poulsen* "Wool is the gold of Faroe Islands", and that was also virtually the situation up to the middel of the 19th century, when sheep were gradually replaced by fish as our predominant source of living - or as our main natural resource. When I was a child this saying was printed in a school textbook in Faroese, but with an addition by the author: "but now it is fish". The conversion from agriculture to fishery led to dramatic changes and im- provement for the Faroese people in almost all aspects of life. At the same time the Faroese fishermen gradually developed into genuine internationalists, fi- shing from Newfoundland in the west to Novaia Semlja in the east and Green- land in the north - the banks off Iceland being the primary fishing-grounds. This was the situation until international law began to loom in the horizon in the late 1950s, and with the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea in 1982 the transition was completed: the small Faroese nation was locked in behind 200 miles of sea. Indeed a vast territory for 45.000 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nordic Journal of International Law Brill

Self-Government and Natural Resources - The Faroese Case I

Nordic Journal of International Law, Volume 57 (3): 338 – Jan 1, 1988

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1988 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0902-7351
eISSN
1571-8107
D.O.I.
10.1163/157181088X00317
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

338 Self-Government and Natural Resources - The Faroese Case I By Halgir Winther Poulsen* "Wool is the gold of Faroe Islands", and that was also virtually the situation up to the middel of the 19th century, when sheep were gradually replaced by fish as our predominant source of living - or as our main natural resource. When I was a child this saying was printed in a school textbook in Faroese, but with an addition by the author: "but now it is fish". The conversion from agriculture to fishery led to dramatic changes and im- provement for the Faroese people in almost all aspects of life. At the same time the Faroese fishermen gradually developed into genuine internationalists, fi- shing from Newfoundland in the west to Novaia Semlja in the east and Green- land in the north - the banks off Iceland being the primary fishing-grounds. This was the situation until international law began to loom in the horizon in the late 1950s, and with the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea in 1982 the transition was completed: the small Faroese nation was locked in behind 200 miles of sea. Indeed a vast territory for 45.000

Journal

Nordic Journal of International LawBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1988

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