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Sartre, the Second Decade

Sartre, the Second Decade 210 itself "philosophy," as it is undertaken in university settings, and which in our time is a hegemony of analytic philosophy, is always already political. The next easily anticipated move would be to question the limit of the campus posed as the limit between a space for rational discourse and a political outside. Could one not propose as a characteristic of Continental thought-or at least Derridean and Foucaultian writing-the call for writing a more complicated topology of the limit of the campus, and that precisely this reflection on the university as the locus of an apolitical philosophy is a leading cause of the anxiety among some analytic philosophers concerning Continental philosophy? One could then understand the otherwise strange use of "deconstruction" by reactionary forces as a metonym for an entire series of "left" curricular and practical reform proposals that would "politi- cize" the university. (The same unrecognizability of the new topology of the limit of campus and politics could also show why "deconstruction" has been derided for being itself "apolitical" by defenders of a certain conception of the left.) With this analysis of "Continental anxiety" we might better be able to ponder the very need for a book http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Sartre, the Second Decade

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 22 (1): 210 – Jan 1, 1992

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1992 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916492X00188
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

210 itself "philosophy," as it is undertaken in university settings, and which in our time is a hegemony of analytic philosophy, is always already political. The next easily anticipated move would be to question the limit of the campus posed as the limit between a space for rational discourse and a political outside. Could one not propose as a characteristic of Continental thought-or at least Derridean and Foucaultian writing-the call for writing a more complicated topology of the limit of the campus, and that precisely this reflection on the university as the locus of an apolitical philosophy is a leading cause of the anxiety among some analytic philosophers concerning Continental philosophy? One could then understand the otherwise strange use of "deconstruction" by reactionary forces as a metonym for an entire series of "left" curricular and practical reform proposals that would "politi- cize" the university. (The same unrecognizability of the new topology of the limit of campus and politics could also show why "deconstruction" has been derided for being itself "apolitical" by defenders of a certain conception of the left.) With this analysis of "Continental anxiety" we might better be able to ponder the very need for a book

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1992

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