Sapphirina iris Dana, 1849 and S. sinuicauda Brady, 1883 (Copepoda, Cyclopoida): predators of salps in Monterey Bay and the Gulf of California

Sapphirina iris Dana, 1849 and S. sinuicauda Brady, 1883 (Copepoda, Cyclopoida): predators of... INTRODUCTION Recent surveys of the gelatinous zooplankton that lives at great depth in the Gulf of California and Monterey Bay have yielded new, interesting information on the biology and ecology of different groups of gelatinous zooplankton (i.e., Siphonophora, Hydromedusae, Ctenophora, Salpida). The use of an ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) and SCUBA diving during these surveys has allowed an important expansion of the knowledge of the biology and ecology of the local planktonic fauna (Madin et al., 2013). Among the most recently explored topics is the biology of the symbiotic associations between the gelatinous zooplankton and pelagic crustaceans (mainly Amphipoda Hyperiidea) (Gasca & Haddock, 2004; Gasca et al., 2015). In general, it is very difficult to obtain knowledge of predator-prey or symbiotic relationships in the marine zooplankton (Heron, 1973). Copepods are known to be associated with all major groups of marine vertebrates and invertebrates, in most cases as parasites. There are only a few articles that deal with the associations between these gelatinous groups with copepods, a group showing an amazing variety of associations in all aquatic habitats (Gasca et al., 2007). In the planktonic realm, symbiotic associations of sapphirinid copepods with different species of salps have been known http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crustaceana Brill

Sapphirina iris Dana, 1849 and S. sinuicauda Brady, 1883 (Copepoda, Cyclopoida): predators of salps in Monterey Bay and the Gulf of California

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2015 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Subject
Articles
ISSN
0011-216x
eISSN
1568-5403
D.O.I.
10.1163/15685403-00003438
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION Recent surveys of the gelatinous zooplankton that lives at great depth in the Gulf of California and Monterey Bay have yielded new, interesting information on the biology and ecology of different groups of gelatinous zooplankton (i.e., Siphonophora, Hydromedusae, Ctenophora, Salpida). The use of an ROV (Remotely Operated Vehicle) and SCUBA diving during these surveys has allowed an important expansion of the knowledge of the biology and ecology of the local planktonic fauna (Madin et al., 2013). Among the most recently explored topics is the biology of the symbiotic associations between the gelatinous zooplankton and pelagic crustaceans (mainly Amphipoda Hyperiidea) (Gasca & Haddock, 2004; Gasca et al., 2015). In general, it is very difficult to obtain knowledge of predator-prey or symbiotic relationships in the marine zooplankton (Heron, 1973). Copepods are known to be associated with all major groups of marine vertebrates and invertebrates, in most cases as parasites. There are only a few articles that deal with the associations between these gelatinous groups with copepods, a group showing an amazing variety of associations in all aquatic habitats (Gasca et al., 2007). In the planktonic realm, symbiotic associations of sapphirinid copepods with different species of salps have been known

Journal

CrustaceanaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2015

References

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