Samuel BELKIN, The Midrash of Philo-The Oldest Recorded Midrash Written in Alexandria by Philo (c. 20 B. C. E. -45 C. E.) Before the Formulation of Tannaitic Literature, Vol. I, Genesis II-XVII; Selected Portions from Philo's Questions and Answers and from his other writings, translated into Hebrew from the Armenian and Greek with a Commentary Based upon Parallels from Rabbinic Literature, edited by Elazar HURVITZ, Yeshiva University Press, New York, NY 1989, 32 and 299 pp. (Hebrew)

Samuel BELKIN, The Midrash of Philo-The Oldest Recorded Midrash Written in Alexandria by Philo... 100 Eulogia. Milanges offerts à A.A.R. Bastiaensen, Steenbrugis 1991, pp. 147- 161). T. MCALOBLISHVILI, "Juden und Christen in Georgien in den ersten christlichen Jahrhunderten" (pp. 94-100), argues from historical and liturgical sources that Jewish-Christians were preponderant in christianiz- ing Georgia in the fourth century. R. VAN DEN BROEK, "Juden und Christen in Alexandrien im 2. und 3. Jahrhundert" (pp. 101-115), while acknowledging the shortage of direct sources, deduces from circumstantial evidence that there was a strong continuity of ideas, and even institutions, between Jews and Christians in second- and third-century Alexandria. His view is based on the oldest Alexandrian gospels, the Sibylline Oracles, Jewish and Christian congregational structure, and theological concepts, both Gnostic and non-Gnostic. A.M. RITTER, "Juden und Christen im Heiligen Land. Paldstina unter Konstantin und Theodosius" (pp. 116- 124), in essence agrees with the picture of a vital Palestinian Judaism in the period from Constantine to Theodosius II given by G. STEMBERGER, and raises some questions on which further study is required. P.W. VAN DER HORST, "Juden und Christen in Aphrodisias im Licht ihrer Beziehungen in anderen Städten Kleinasiens" (pp. 125-143), discusses the long inscription found in Aphrodisias in Caria, Asia Minor, and pub- lished in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal for the Study of Judaism Brill

Samuel BELKIN, The Midrash of Philo-The Oldest Recorded Midrash Written in Alexandria by Philo (c. 20 B. C. E. -45 C. E.) Before the Formulation of Tannaitic Literature, Vol. I, Genesis II-XVII; Selected Portions from Philo's Questions and Answers and from his other writings, translated into Hebrew from the Armenian and Greek with a Commentary Based upon Parallels from Rabbinic Literature, edited by Elazar HURVITZ, Yeshiva University Press, New York, NY 1989, 32 and 299 pp. (Hebrew)

Journal for the Study of Judaism, Volume 23 (1): 100 – Jan 1, 1992

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1992 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0047-2212
eISSN
1570-0631
DOI
10.1163/157006392X00322
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

100 Eulogia. Milanges offerts à A.A.R. Bastiaensen, Steenbrugis 1991, pp. 147- 161). T. MCALOBLISHVILI, "Juden und Christen in Georgien in den ersten christlichen Jahrhunderten" (pp. 94-100), argues from historical and liturgical sources that Jewish-Christians were preponderant in christianiz- ing Georgia in the fourth century. R. VAN DEN BROEK, "Juden und Christen in Alexandrien im 2. und 3. Jahrhundert" (pp. 101-115), while acknowledging the shortage of direct sources, deduces from circumstantial evidence that there was a strong continuity of ideas, and even institutions, between Jews and Christians in second- and third-century Alexandria. His view is based on the oldest Alexandrian gospels, the Sibylline Oracles, Jewish and Christian congregational structure, and theological concepts, both Gnostic and non-Gnostic. A.M. RITTER, "Juden und Christen im Heiligen Land. Paldstina unter Konstantin und Theodosius" (pp. 116- 124), in essence agrees with the picture of a vital Palestinian Judaism in the period from Constantine to Theodosius II given by G. STEMBERGER, and raises some questions on which further study is required. P.W. VAN DER HORST, "Juden und Christen in Aphrodisias im Licht ihrer Beziehungen in anderen Städten Kleinasiens" (pp. 125-143), discusses the long inscription found in Aphrodisias in Caria, Asia Minor, and pub- lished in

Journal

Journal for the Study of JudaismBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1992

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