Samarqand’s Rigestān and its Architectural Meanings

Samarqand’s Rigestān and its Architectural Meanings © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI: 10.1163/187471610X537262 Journal of Persianate Studies 3 (2010) 156-191 brill.nl/jps Samarqand’s Rigestān and its Architectural Meanings Sulhiniso Rahmatullaeva New Jersey Abstract The article focuses on the central plaza of the city of Samarqand, the seat of Transoxiana under the Sogdians and again under the Timurids. The earliest edifice on the Rigestān square is an early fifteenth-century madrasa named after the Timurid prince-scholar Ulugh Beg. Although the capital was transferred to Bukhara after the final conquest of Samarqand by the Uzbeks in 1500, the Shaibanids and their successors, the Ashtarkhanids, continued to embellish Samar- qand with more imperial constructions. The Rigestān thus received its final form with two addi- tional madrasa s, the Shirdār and the Talākāri, by 1660. The article aims at describing and evaluating these structures and their architectural details, vis-à-vis the latest scholarship on art history. Keywords Samarqand, Registan, Ulugh Beg, madrasa , art history Religions disperse like mist, empires dismantle But the works of wise men remain for eternity. Ulugh Beg (1394-1449) In ancient Samarqand, as in other large cities, construction projects repre- sented not only practical solutions to the population’s needs but also the real- ization of ambitious http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Persianate Studies Brill

Samarqand’s Rigestān and its Architectural Meanings

Journal of Persianate Studies, Volume 3 (2): 156 – Jan 1, 2010

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2010 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1874-7094
eISSN
1874-7167
D.O.I.
10.1163/187471610X537262
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2010 DOI: 10.1163/187471610X537262 Journal of Persianate Studies 3 (2010) 156-191 brill.nl/jps Samarqand’s Rigestān and its Architectural Meanings Sulhiniso Rahmatullaeva New Jersey Abstract The article focuses on the central plaza of the city of Samarqand, the seat of Transoxiana under the Sogdians and again under the Timurids. The earliest edifice on the Rigestān square is an early fifteenth-century madrasa named after the Timurid prince-scholar Ulugh Beg. Although the capital was transferred to Bukhara after the final conquest of Samarqand by the Uzbeks in 1500, the Shaibanids and their successors, the Ashtarkhanids, continued to embellish Samar- qand with more imperial constructions. The Rigestān thus received its final form with two addi- tional madrasa s, the Shirdār and the Talākāri, by 1660. The article aims at describing and evaluating these structures and their architectural details, vis-à-vis the latest scholarship on art history. Keywords Samarqand, Registan, Ulugh Beg, madrasa , art history Religions disperse like mist, empires dismantle But the works of wise men remain for eternity. Ulugh Beg (1394-1449) In ancient Samarqand, as in other large cities, construction projects repre- sented not only practical solutions to the population’s needs but also the real- ization of ambitious

Journal

Journal of Persianate StudiesBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2010

Keywords: madrasa; Samarqand; Ulugh Beg; Registan; art history

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