Ryckaert Aertsz or Ryck Metter Stelt (Ryck with the Stilt)

Ryckaert Aertsz or Ryck Metter Stelt (Ryck with the Stilt) 217 Ryckaert Aertsz or Ryck Metter Stelt (Ryck with the Stilt) by N. Beets Froin a visit paid to the "lVluseumsinsel" and the Print Room at Berlin in 1938, when the war was already imminent, the author brought eight photographs of drawings in the Print Room, illustrated here in Nos. 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15 and 18. They were all regarded as being the work of the "master of the Berlin Sketchbook" (Cat. Bock und Rosenberg 19 C 2a). At the time the author chose such drawings as by their ornament and quality were related to Dirick Vellert, with whom he had been specially occupied from 1906 to 1924 for a study in "Onze Kunst". These leaves continued to intrigue him, until in 1954 his partner Mr S. J. Fontein brought from London a photograph of a sheet showing Christ's Holy Kinship and in verso a fine hilly Woodland Scenery. The drawing was purchased. Christ's Holy Kinship was signed Rij c metter Stelt (Rij ck with the stilt) in the same greyish brown ink of the whole drawing. The two sides of the sheet are published here for the first time (ill. 2 and 3). The unmethodical technique of drawing (comparable with some early drawings by Diirer), the women's eyes without pupils, the short, shaky strokes, the rapidity of sketching, prove to be typical of this master. With reference to the illustrations the author tries to show that the Berlin Sketchbook leaves can also be attributed to the draughts- man of the signed Christ's Holy Kinship, thus to Rijck with the Stilt. Until Dr. H. E. van Gelder published his study of the stained-glass windows in St. Jacob's Church, The Hague, nothing was known about this artist except what Van Mander told about him in his "Schildcrbocck" (Painters' Book). The author therefore refers to Van Mander's interesting short story; the reader who does not understand Dutch may consult the good translation into French by Henri Hymans (I pp. 373-375) or the translation into German by Hanns Floerke (I pp. 357/58). The most important indications for the attribution to Rijckaert are the similarities between ill. 6, 7, 14 and 2, 3. The sheet represented by ill. 4 and 5 may also be regarded as belonging to the Berlin Sketchbook. Owing to the recent discovery of the signed drawing the author now retracts his former tentative attribution of the Tournament (ill. 14) to Dirick Vellert and assigns it to Rijck. In his long life this Dutchman, who went to live at Antwerp, participated at an early date in an exquisite and brilliant manner in the transition from the Gothic style to the Renaissance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oud Holland - Quarterly for Dutch Art History Brill

Ryckaert Aertsz or Ryck Metter Stelt (Ryck with the Stilt)

Oud Holland - Quarterly for Dutch Art History, Volume 72 (1): 217 – Jan 1, 1957

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1957 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0030-672x
eISSN
1875-0176
DOI
10.1163/187501757X00171
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

217 Ryckaert Aertsz or Ryck Metter Stelt (Ryck with the Stilt) by N. Beets Froin a visit paid to the "lVluseumsinsel" and the Print Room at Berlin in 1938, when the war was already imminent, the author brought eight photographs of drawings in the Print Room, illustrated here in Nos. 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15 and 18. They were all regarded as being the work of the "master of the Berlin Sketchbook" (Cat. Bock und Rosenberg 19 C 2a). At the time the author chose such drawings as by their ornament and quality were related to Dirick Vellert, with whom he had been specially occupied from 1906 to 1924 for a study in "Onze Kunst". These leaves continued to intrigue him, until in 1954 his partner Mr S. J. Fontein brought from London a photograph of a sheet showing Christ's Holy Kinship and in verso a fine hilly Woodland Scenery. The drawing was purchased. Christ's Holy Kinship was signed Rij c metter Stelt (Rij ck with the stilt) in the same greyish brown ink of the whole drawing. The two sides of the sheet are published here for the first time (ill. 2 and 3). The unmethodical technique of drawing (comparable with some early drawings by Diirer), the women's eyes without pupils, the short, shaky strokes, the rapidity of sketching, prove to be typical of this master. With reference to the illustrations the author tries to show that the Berlin Sketchbook leaves can also be attributed to the draughts- man of the signed Christ's Holy Kinship, thus to Rijck with the Stilt. Until Dr. H. E. van Gelder published his study of the stained-glass windows in St. Jacob's Church, The Hague, nothing was known about this artist except what Van Mander told about him in his "Schildcrbocck" (Painters' Book). The author therefore refers to Van Mander's interesting short story; the reader who does not understand Dutch may consult the good translation into French by Henri Hymans (I pp. 373-375) or the translation into German by Hanns Floerke (I pp. 357/58). The most important indications for the attribution to Rijckaert are the similarities between ill. 6, 7, 14 and 2, 3. The sheet represented by ill. 4 and 5 may also be regarded as belonging to the Berlin Sketchbook. Owing to the recent discovery of the signed drawing the author now retracts his former tentative attribution of the Tournament (ill. 14) to Dirick Vellert and assigns it to Rijck. In his long life this Dutchman, who went to live at Antwerp, participated at an early date in an exquisite and brilliant manner in the transition from the Gothic style to the Renaissance.

Journal

Oud Holland - Quarterly for Dutch Art HistoryBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1957

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