Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Rorty on Liberal Democracy and Religion: An Internal and Habermasian Critique

Rorty on Liberal Democracy and Religion: An Internal and Habermasian Critique Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 8, No. 1 (June 2011), 97­114 Editions Rodopi © 2011 Rorty was one of the great dissolvers of dualisms, but strangely this iconoclasm ended when it came to liberal democracy. Here he held fast to the most stubborn of dualisms in political thought, a simple dichotomy of the public and the private, and used it, unsuccessfully, to resolve questions concerning the place of religion in modern democratic politics. Yet the philosophical basis of Rorty's pragmatism both undercuts two common ways of spelling out the relationship between religion and the polity in liberalism and makes his use of the public/private dichotomy impossible. By means of an internal critique, I argue for a Habermasian corrective. Rorty was one of the great dissolvers of dualisms and dichotomies. He also fought against the lack of historical consciousness that often supports a sense that there are no alternatives to them. Yet strangely this iconoclasm seemed to end when it came to liberal democracy in modern Western societies. Here he held fast to the most stubborn of dualisms in the realm of political thought, the distinction between the public and the private, and used it, unsuccessfully, to resolve the thorny question http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

Rorty on Liberal Democracy and Religion: An Internal and Habermasian Critique

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 8 (1): 97 – Apr 21, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/rorty-on-liberal-democracy-and-religion-an-internal-and-habermasian-4WQ5Nl0FRG
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2011 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000185
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 8, No. 1 (June 2011), 97­114 Editions Rodopi © 2011 Rorty was one of the great dissolvers of dualisms, but strangely this iconoclasm ended when it came to liberal democracy. Here he held fast to the most stubborn of dualisms in political thought, a simple dichotomy of the public and the private, and used it, unsuccessfully, to resolve questions concerning the place of religion in modern democratic politics. Yet the philosophical basis of Rorty's pragmatism both undercuts two common ways of spelling out the relationship between religion and the polity in liberalism and makes his use of the public/private dichotomy impossible. By means of an internal critique, I argue for a Habermasian corrective. Rorty was one of the great dissolvers of dualisms and dichotomies. He also fought against the lack of historical consciousness that often supports a sense that there are no alternatives to them. Yet strangely this iconoclasm seemed to end when it came to liberal democracy in modern Western societies. Here he held fast to the most stubborn of dualisms in the realm of political thought, the distinction between the public and the private, and used it, unsuccessfully, to resolve the thorny question

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2011

There are no references for this article.