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Riveted to a Monstrous Site

Riveted to a Monstrous Site RIVETED TO A MONSTROUS SITE by DENNIS J. SCHMIDT Pennsylvania State University I feel like Ahab. I have been asked to write about the great and mas- sive book, Broken Hegemonies , but I confess that it feels as if I have been asked to catch Moby Dick. Like that whale, Broken Hegemonies is some- thing of great power—it not only speaks about power; it performs it as well in its style—and like that whale, one cannot seem to look directly into its eyes (which is what one does when one reads). Though it comes at one bluntly, something oblique and o ff to the side seems always to be at the heart of what is said here. Full of pronounce- ments, Broken Hegemonies remains, for me at least, very di ffi cult to grasp. And yet, every time I believe I have lost the thread of its argument, it resurfaces with great power and irresistible insight. So, call me Ahab. In order to whittle this monster down to a size I can confront, I propose to speak only about its opening and closing concerns. Unjustly, I will ignore its great bulk to speak of what frames it. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Riveted to a Monstrous Site

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 35 (1): 327 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2005 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/1569164054905456
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

RIVETED TO A MONSTROUS SITE by DENNIS J. SCHMIDT Pennsylvania State University I feel like Ahab. I have been asked to write about the great and mas- sive book, Broken Hegemonies , but I confess that it feels as if I have been asked to catch Moby Dick. Like that whale, Broken Hegemonies is some- thing of great power—it not only speaks about power; it performs it as well in its style—and like that whale, one cannot seem to look directly into its eyes (which is what one does when one reads). Though it comes at one bluntly, something oblique and o ff to the side seems always to be at the heart of what is said here. Full of pronounce- ments, Broken Hegemonies remains, for me at least, very di ffi cult to grasp. And yet, every time I believe I have lost the thread of its argument, it resurfaces with great power and irresistible insight. So, call me Ahab. In order to whittle this monster down to a size I can confront, I propose to speak only about its opening and closing concerns. Unjustly, I will ignore its great bulk to speak of what frames it.

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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