Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Richard Rorty and the Philosophical Life

Richard Rorty and the Philosophical Life Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 8, No. 1 (June 2011), 35­45 Editions Rodopi © 2011 Rorty's "philosophical life" as a public intellectual was aimed at dispelling the belief that there is a transcendent source of information about what is true and real that humans are obliged to bow down to. From a historical standpoint, his thought can be seen as the culmination of a development of ideas leading to the view that humans determine what counts as real and right. This paper traces this view and also questions whether, in its most robust form, it is tenable. 1. In choosing "Rorty and the Philosophical Life" as the title of my paper, I am invoking a book that seems especially relevant to understanding Rorty: Pierre Hadot's Philosophy as a Way of Life. Hadot's principal claim there is that the ancient schools of philosophy were not really interested in giving arguments to prove metaphysical and epistemological claims, as we generally suppose today. On the contrary, their goal in defending theses and discovering truths was subordinate to what to them was their primary aim, which was to formulate an understanding of the optimally good life for the sage, and on that basis to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

Richard Rorty and the Philosophical Life

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 8 (1): 35 – Apr 21, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/richard-rorty-and-the-philosophical-life-PHBy1kSFkG
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2011 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000181
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 8, No. 1 (June 2011), 35­45 Editions Rodopi © 2011 Rorty's "philosophical life" as a public intellectual was aimed at dispelling the belief that there is a transcendent source of information about what is true and real that humans are obliged to bow down to. From a historical standpoint, his thought can be seen as the culmination of a development of ideas leading to the view that humans determine what counts as real and right. This paper traces this view and also questions whether, in its most robust form, it is tenable. 1. In choosing "Rorty and the Philosophical Life" as the title of my paper, I am invoking a book that seems especially relevant to understanding Rorty: Pierre Hadot's Philosophy as a Way of Life. Hadot's principal claim there is that the ancient schools of philosophy were not really interested in giving arguments to prove metaphysical and epistemological claims, as we generally suppose today. On the contrary, their goal in defending theses and discovering truths was subordinate to what to them was their primary aim, which was to formulate an understanding of the optimally good life for the sage, and on that basis to

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2011

There are no references for this article.