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Revitalizing Global Environmental Governance for Climate Change

Revitalizing Global Environmental Governance for Climate Change Global Governance 15 (2009), 427-434 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Revitalizing Global Environmental Governance for Climate Change Daniel C. Esty hether the December 2009 negotiations in Copenhagen produce “success” or real success —that is to say, merely a foundation for W further negotiations or a full-blown new post–Kyoto Protocol cli- mate change agreement—the world seems headed for a period of extraordinary international environmental activity with implications for every nation, commu- nity, business, and individual on the planet. The scale, complexity, and potential cost of responding to the threat of climate change make this a policy challenge of unprecedented proportions. And it is becoming increasingly clear that the worldwide effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate the threat of global warming and related problems, including changed rainfall patterns, melt- ing polar ice, sea-level rise, and increased intensity of windstorms, will not be successful without significant institutional support at the global scale. The existing global environmental governance system, centered on the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) in Nairobi, is by almost all accounts not up to the task of managing the response to climate change. UNEP suffers from a vague mandate, severe budget constraints, limited analytic capacity, and other human resource challenges as well http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Revitalizing Global Environmental Governance for Climate Change

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01504002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 15 (2009), 427-434 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Revitalizing Global Environmental Governance for Climate Change Daniel C. Esty hether the December 2009 negotiations in Copenhagen produce “success” or real success —that is to say, merely a foundation for W further negotiations or a full-blown new post–Kyoto Protocol cli- mate change agreement—the world seems headed for a period of extraordinary international environmental activity with implications for every nation, commu- nity, business, and individual on the planet. The scale, complexity, and potential cost of responding to the threat of climate change make this a policy challenge of unprecedented proportions. And it is becoming increasingly clear that the worldwide effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate the threat of global warming and related problems, including changed rainfall patterns, melt- ing polar ice, sea-level rise, and increased intensity of windstorms, will not be successful without significant institutional support at the global scale. The existing global environmental governance system, centered on the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) in Nairobi, is by almost all accounts not up to the task of managing the response to climate change. UNEP suffers from a vague mandate, severe budget constraints, limited analytic capacity, and other human resource challenges as well

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 12, 2009

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