Reviews

Reviews REVIEWS F.R. KRAUS, The Role of the Temples from the Third Dynasty of Ur to the First Dynasty of Babylon (Monographs on the Ancient Near East vol. 2/4; Undena Publications, Malibu 1990; 4to, iv + 20 p.). Temples, since the beginning of Mesopotamian civilisation, were a very prominent, typically urban feature of ancient cities, dominating their skyline (they were built on elevated terraces), and playing a key role in its social and economic life. Cities probably even arose from settlements clustered around important shrines at strategically located sites. According to the mythical traditions, temples and cities even would have been founded by the gods as their dwelling places before the creation of men. Temples remained important also when, in the course of time (already in the first half of the third millennium B.C.), possibly due to functional diversification and/or in consequence of rivalry for power between the city- states, the palace arose, the household of the man ruling the city in the name of the city-god, which in due time would dominate the scene. Temples continued to play their role, also as the embodiment of the city's ideology, and palace and temple rarely became rivals, since both shared http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient Brill

Loading next page...
1
 
/lp/brill/reviews-zdlCTeb5XH
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1994 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0022-4995
eISSN
1568-5209
D.O.I.
10.1163/156852094X00091
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

REVIEWS F.R. KRAUS, The Role of the Temples from the Third Dynasty of Ur to the First Dynasty of Babylon (Monographs on the Ancient Near East vol. 2/4; Undena Publications, Malibu 1990; 4to, iv + 20 p.). Temples, since the beginning of Mesopotamian civilisation, were a very prominent, typically urban feature of ancient cities, dominating their skyline (they were built on elevated terraces), and playing a key role in its social and economic life. Cities probably even arose from settlements clustered around important shrines at strategically located sites. According to the mythical traditions, temples and cities even would have been founded by the gods as their dwelling places before the creation of men. Temples remained important also when, in the course of time (already in the first half of the third millennium B.C.), possibly due to functional diversification and/or in consequence of rivalry for power between the city- states, the palace arose, the household of the man ruling the city in the name of the city-god, which in due time would dominate the scene. Temples continued to play their role, also as the embodiment of the city's ideology, and palace and temple rarely became rivals, since both shared

Journal

Journal of the Economic and Social History of the OrientBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1994

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off