REVIEW ARTICLES

REVIEW ARTICLES 456 Review Articles / Research in Phenomenology 37 (2007) 443–463 Socratic Phusis and Socratic Praxis Peter Warnek. Descent of Socrates: Self-Knowledge and Cryptic Nature in the Platonic Dialogues . Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2005. 228 pp. Index. In Descent of Socrates: Self-Knowledge and Cryptic Nature in the Platonic Dia- logues , Peter Warnek offers a compelling challenge to the traditional character- ization of Socratic practice as a turn away from nature. His critical engagement with one of the most entrenched portrayals of Socrates’ service to the history of philosophy stems from a serious reflection on the question of what it means to attribute to philosophy a history. Indeed, according to Warnek, to confront the question of Socrates is to confront “the uniquely historical dimension of think- ing itself ” (5). Doing so requires that one address the question of Socrates’ role in the history of philosophy in a manner that does justice to the enigmatic status of this figure as an origin of philosophical thought. Th is, in turn, requires that one take seriously Socrates’ characterization of his pursuit of self-knowledge as an inquiry into his own nature, that is, as an engagement with φύσις . Th us, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2007 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916407X227929
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

456 Review Articles / Research in Phenomenology 37 (2007) 443–463 Socratic Phusis and Socratic Praxis Peter Warnek. Descent of Socrates: Self-Knowledge and Cryptic Nature in the Platonic Dialogues . Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2005. 228 pp. Index. In Descent of Socrates: Self-Knowledge and Cryptic Nature in the Platonic Dia- logues , Peter Warnek offers a compelling challenge to the traditional character- ization of Socratic practice as a turn away from nature. His critical engagement with one of the most entrenched portrayals of Socrates’ service to the history of philosophy stems from a serious reflection on the question of what it means to attribute to philosophy a history. Indeed, according to Warnek, to confront the question of Socrates is to confront “the uniquely historical dimension of think- ing itself ” (5). Doing so requires that one address the question of Socrates’ role in the history of philosophy in a manner that does justice to the enigmatic status of this figure as an origin of philosophical thought. Th is, in turn, requires that one take seriously Socrates’ characterization of his pursuit of self-knowledge as an inquiry into his own nature, that is, as an engagement with φύσις . Th us,

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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