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Responsibilities in Transition: Emerging Powers in the Climate Change Negotiations

Responsibilities in Transition: Emerging Powers in the Climate Change Negotiations Global Governance 21 (2015), 205–226 Responsibilities in Transition: Emerging Powers in the Climate Change Negotiations Kathryn Hochstetler and Manjana Milkoreit The BASIC countries (Brazil, South Africa, India, and China) play an in- creasingly prominent role in global climate negotiations. Climate gover- nance spotlights burden-sharing arrangements, asking countries to take on potentially costly actions to resolve a global problem, even as the ben- efits are generally indivisible public goods. This article examines the BASIC countries’ own Joint Statements and their individual and collective sub- missions to multilateral climate negotiations to identify the rationalist and principled arguments they have made about the climate burden-sharing requirements that developed countries, developing countries, and they themselves should face in global climate governance. It argues that their expectations for their own role are particularly unclear, with greater na- tional action than international commitments to do so. KEYWORDS: climate change, emerging powers, power transition, burden sharing. IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY, THERE IS LITTLE DOUBT THAT THE EMERGING powers are transforming the institutions and habits of global governance. They are seeking and gaining new influence on global rule making in areas from trade to finance to poverty reduction. In contrast, they spent much of the 2000s trying http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Responsibilities in Transition: Emerging Powers in the Climate Change Negotiations

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-02102003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 21 (2015), 205–226 Responsibilities in Transition: Emerging Powers in the Climate Change Negotiations Kathryn Hochstetler and Manjana Milkoreit The BASIC countries (Brazil, South Africa, India, and China) play an in- creasingly prominent role in global climate negotiations. Climate gover- nance spotlights burden-sharing arrangements, asking countries to take on potentially costly actions to resolve a global problem, even as the ben- efits are generally indivisible public goods. This article examines the BASIC countries’ own Joint Statements and their individual and collective sub- missions to multilateral climate negotiations to identify the rationalist and principled arguments they have made about the climate burden-sharing requirements that developed countries, developing countries, and they themselves should face in global climate governance. It argues that their expectations for their own role are particularly unclear, with greater na- tional action than international commitments to do so. KEYWORDS: climate change, emerging powers, power transition, burden sharing. IN THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY, THERE IS LITTLE DOUBT THAT THE EMERGING powers are transforming the institutions and habits of global governance. They are seeking and gaining new influence on global rule making in areas from trade to finance to poverty reduction. In contrast, they spent much of the 2000s trying

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2015

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