Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Response to Daniel Libeskind

Response to Daniel Libeskind 88 Response to Daniel Libeskind JACQUES DERRIDA École des Hautes-Études en Sciences Sociales You know that someone-I think it was a philosopher-says "Language is the house of being." He meant, in some way, one's own language. You feel at home when you speak your own language. And one of the things I have to face now is to speak English, to improvise in English, and I do not feel at home at all. That is my first experience of das Unheimliche: improvising, after Daniel Libeskind, in English. I have to cross, to intersect, some of the questions I had prepared and those that came to my mind while listening today. My remarks will look like a sort of wandering, an erring, and a zigzagging. And speaking of zigzag, it has just occurred to me that I have a very good friend in France, someone I much admire, who has written a wonderful book entitled Zigzag. I highly recommend it. It is a book written by Jean-Claude Lebensztein, who is an historian of art, a writer interested in music, art, and so on. As a young Polish Jew, Lebensztein lost his family in the War. He was brought up http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Response to Daniel Libeskind

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 22 (1): 88 – Jan 1, 1992

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/response-to-daniel-libeskind-JffUkLhHCP
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1992 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916492X00098
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

88 Response to Daniel Libeskind JACQUES DERRIDA École des Hautes-Études en Sciences Sociales You know that someone-I think it was a philosopher-says "Language is the house of being." He meant, in some way, one's own language. You feel at home when you speak your own language. And one of the things I have to face now is to speak English, to improvise in English, and I do not feel at home at all. That is my first experience of das Unheimliche: improvising, after Daniel Libeskind, in English. I have to cross, to intersect, some of the questions I had prepared and those that came to my mind while listening today. My remarks will look like a sort of wandering, an erring, and a zigzagging. And speaking of zigzag, it has just occurred to me that I have a very good friend in France, someone I much admire, who has written a wonderful book entitled Zigzag. I highly recommend it. It is a book written by Jean-Claude Lebensztein, who is an historian of art, a writer interested in music, art, and so on. As a young Polish Jew, Lebensztein lost his family in the War. He was brought up

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1992

There are no references for this article.