Respecifying the Effects of Voluntary Association on Individuals in a Traditional Society

Respecifying the Effects of Voluntary Association on Individuals in a Traditional Society Respecifying the Effects of Voluntary Association on Individuals in a Traditional Society* RANDALL J. THOMSON North Carolina State University, Raleigh, U.S.A. MICHAEL ARMER Florida State University, Tallahassee, U. S. A. LITERATURE ON THE EFFECTS of participation in voluntary associations is extensive. Some scholars claim that participation in voluntary associations produces integration of individuals, communities and societies by providing affectual support, by implementing values, and by supporting the normative order (Durkheim, 1933; Babchuk and Edwards, 1965; Little, 1965; Banton, 1968; Kerri, 1976). Others claim that, instead of integration, volun- tary associations reinforce the cultural distinctiveness of various ethnic and minority groups (Rose, 1954; Rouch, 1954; Litwak, 1961; Gordon, 1964; Palisi, 1966), serve as political pressure groups that check the state's power (Tocqueville, 1945; Dahl, 1956; Almond and Verba, 1963; Verba and Nie, 1972), mobilize individuals for change (Olsen, 1972; Turner and Killian, 1972) and even contribute to major political changes including independence and statehood movements (Wallerstein, 1964; Levy and Kramer, 1972; Meillassoux, 1968; Paden, 1973). These seemingly inconsistent claims can be partially resolved by acknowledging the multifunctional and dynamic capabilities of voluntary associations and by differentiating between types of associations in different contexts. Specifically, voluntary associations can serve both http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology) Brill

Respecifying the Effects of Voluntary Association on Individuals in a Traditional Society

International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology), Volume 21 (3-4): 288 – Jan 1, 1980

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1980 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0020-7152
eISSN
1745-2554
D.O.I.
10.1163/156854280X00227
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Respecifying the Effects of Voluntary Association on Individuals in a Traditional Society* RANDALL J. THOMSON North Carolina State University, Raleigh, U.S.A. MICHAEL ARMER Florida State University, Tallahassee, U. S. A. LITERATURE ON THE EFFECTS of participation in voluntary associations is extensive. Some scholars claim that participation in voluntary associations produces integration of individuals, communities and societies by providing affectual support, by implementing values, and by supporting the normative order (Durkheim, 1933; Babchuk and Edwards, 1965; Little, 1965; Banton, 1968; Kerri, 1976). Others claim that, instead of integration, volun- tary associations reinforce the cultural distinctiveness of various ethnic and minority groups (Rose, 1954; Rouch, 1954; Litwak, 1961; Gordon, 1964; Palisi, 1966), serve as political pressure groups that check the state's power (Tocqueville, 1945; Dahl, 1956; Almond and Verba, 1963; Verba and Nie, 1972), mobilize individuals for change (Olsen, 1972; Turner and Killian, 1972) and even contribute to major political changes including independence and statehood movements (Wallerstein, 1964; Levy and Kramer, 1972; Meillassoux, 1968; Paden, 1973). These seemingly inconsistent claims can be partially resolved by acknowledging the multifunctional and dynamic capabilities of voluntary associations and by differentiating between types of associations in different contexts. Specifically, voluntary associations can serve both

Journal

International Journal of Comparative Sociology (in 2002 continued as Comparative Sociology)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1980

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