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Researching Africa’s Past. New Contributions from British Archaeologists. Proceedings of a meeting held at St Hugh’s College, Oxford, Saturday April 20 th 2002. By Peter Mitchell, Anne Haour & John Hobart (eds.). Oxford University School of Archaeology Monograph No. 57. Oxford University School of Archaeology, Oxford, U. K., 2003, viii + 152 pages. ISBN 0-947816-58-5. Price: UK£40.

Researching Africa’s Past. New Contributions from British Archaeologists. Proceedings of a... Africanist archaeologists from other countries might find the slightly nationalistic flavour of this publication a little curious but, as its editors explain in their introduction, it marks a rebirth of interest in African archaeology amongst British researchers. In that introduction they outline the history of British archaeological endeavours in Africa, although curiously ignoring the past efforts of a number of people including even Bernard Fagg, whose final post was as Director of the Pitt Rivers Museum in the very University of Oxford from which this publication comes. Furthermore, their introduction fails to emphasize sufficiently how very little interest there was in Africa by Britishbased archaeologists at one time. So bad was the situation in the 1960s and 1970s, that a whole generation of British archaeologists who had extensive African experience were scattered across the world in search of employment. Even Desmond Clark, who together with Betty Clark is the subject of a tribute by Ray Inskeep in the second paper of this book, never actually held a post in a British institution. The editors and most of the contributors to this volume are of a younger generation, happily spared the post-colonial guilt complex that seems to have been http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of African Archaeology Brill

Researching Africa’s Past. New Contributions from British Archaeologists. Proceedings of a meeting held at St Hugh’s College, Oxford, Saturday April 20 th 2002. By Peter Mitchell, Anne Haour & John Hobart (eds.). Oxford University School of Archaeology Monograph No. 57. Oxford University School of Archaeology, Oxford, U. K., 2003, viii + 152 pages. ISBN 0-947816-58-5. Price: UK£40.

Journal of African Archaeology , Volume 2 (2): 277 – Oct 25, 2004

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2004 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1612-1651
eISSN
2191-5784
DOI
10.3213/1612-1651-10032
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Africanist archaeologists from other countries might find the slightly nationalistic flavour of this publication a little curious but, as its editors explain in their introduction, it marks a rebirth of interest in African archaeology amongst British researchers. In that introduction they outline the history of British archaeological endeavours in Africa, although curiously ignoring the past efforts of a number of people including even Bernard Fagg, whose final post was as Director of the Pitt Rivers Museum in the very University of Oxford from which this publication comes. Furthermore, their introduction fails to emphasize sufficiently how very little interest there was in Africa by Britishbased archaeologists at one time. So bad was the situation in the 1960s and 1970s, that a whole generation of British archaeologists who had extensive African experience were scattered across the world in search of employment. Even Desmond Clark, who together with Betty Clark is the subject of a tribute by Ray Inskeep in the second paper of this book, never actually held a post in a British institution. The editors and most of the contributors to this volume are of a younger generation, happily spared the post-colonial guilt complex that seems to have been

Journal

Journal of African ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Oct 25, 2004

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