Research On Research: the Human Dimensions

Research On Research: the Human Dimensions 148 RESEARCH ON RESEARCH: THE HUMAN DIMENSIONS Louis A. Perrott, Ph.D. Psychology has succeeded in becoming readily accepted by most as another of the natural sciences. The history of this ac- ceptance in the U.S. dates back at least to the rebellion of John Watson against the introspectionists. He and others after him insisted that psychology achieve a position as another natural scientific discipline by emulating the more mature and well- established physical sciences. Resultingly, as has now been well documented (Koch, 1959; Giorgi, 1970) psychology adopted as its "paradigm" (Kuhn, pp. 43-51) the methodology of the natural sciences, most notably exemplified by the laboratory experiment in physics. Yet, concurrent with this historical development, dissatisfied voices raised objections to the use of "scientific method" for the study of human behavior. Current "human potential" or "humanistic" psychology is one manifestation of the growth of such opposition. "Existential" psychology in America, as well as "phenomenological" psychology are yet others. All of these voices in one form or another were questioning the ap- propriateness of the natural scientific paradigm for dealing with human phenomena. Thomas Kuhn (1962) has examined the historical course pursued by different scientific paradigms. Initial success is first http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Phenomenological Psychology Brill

Research On Research: the Human Dimensions

Journal of Phenomenological Psychology, Volume 7 (2): 148 – Jan 1, 1977

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1977 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0047-2662
eISSN
1569-1624
D.O.I.
10.1163/156916277X00033
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

148 RESEARCH ON RESEARCH: THE HUMAN DIMENSIONS Louis A. Perrott, Ph.D. Psychology has succeeded in becoming readily accepted by most as another of the natural sciences. The history of this ac- ceptance in the U.S. dates back at least to the rebellion of John Watson against the introspectionists. He and others after him insisted that psychology achieve a position as another natural scientific discipline by emulating the more mature and well- established physical sciences. Resultingly, as has now been well documented (Koch, 1959; Giorgi, 1970) psychology adopted as its "paradigm" (Kuhn, pp. 43-51) the methodology of the natural sciences, most notably exemplified by the laboratory experiment in physics. Yet, concurrent with this historical development, dissatisfied voices raised objections to the use of "scientific method" for the study of human behavior. Current "human potential" or "humanistic" psychology is one manifestation of the growth of such opposition. "Existential" psychology in America, as well as "phenomenological" psychology are yet others. All of these voices in one form or another were questioning the ap- propriateness of the natural scientific paradigm for dealing with human phenomena. Thomas Kuhn (1962) has examined the historical course pursued by different scientific paradigms. Initial success is first

Journal

Journal of Phenomenological PsychologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1977

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