Reproductive modes, ontogenies, and the evolution of body form

Reproductive modes, ontogenies, and the evolution of body form Animal Biology , Vol. 53, No. 3, pp. 209-223 (2003) Ó Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2003. Also available online - www.brill.nl Reproductive modes, ontogenies, and the evolution of body form MARVALEE H. WAKE Department of Integrative Biology, and Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3140 Abstract —The evolution and development of complex morphological structures, and of body form, can now be addressed hierarchically, using diverse techniques from multiple theoretical perspectives. Such an ‘integrative’ or ‘holistic’ approach is likely to provide more complete insight into the origin of patterns and processes of evolution than the more traditional reductionist mode. Current work on the implications of reproductive mode on the ontogenies of amphibians and the evolution of their body form is an example of that approach. Genome size, egg and clutch size, and a number of other life history traits are involved with developmental rate and pattern (including loss of larval features, ontogenetic repatterning, and modiŽ ed patterns of organogenesis), and reproductive mode (the presumed ancestral egg-laying vs. direct development and viviparity) is correlated and potentially causal for certain patterns. Such correlations are being explored using a variety of approaches, and examples of this work-in-progress are provided. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Animal Biology Brill

Reproductive modes, ontogenies, and the evolution of body form

Animal Biology, Volume 53 (3): 209 – Jan 1, 2003

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2003 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7555
eISSN
1570-7563
D.O.I.
10.1163/157075603322539426
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Animal Biology , Vol. 53, No. 3, pp. 209-223 (2003) Ó Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2003. Also available online - www.brill.nl Reproductive modes, ontogenies, and the evolution of body form MARVALEE H. WAKE Department of Integrative Biology, and Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3140 Abstract —The evolution and development of complex morphological structures, and of body form, can now be addressed hierarchically, using diverse techniques from multiple theoretical perspectives. Such an ‘integrative’ or ‘holistic’ approach is likely to provide more complete insight into the origin of patterns and processes of evolution than the more traditional reductionist mode. Current work on the implications of reproductive mode on the ontogenies of amphibians and the evolution of their body form is an example of that approach. Genome size, egg and clutch size, and a number of other life history traits are involved with developmental rate and pattern (including loss of larval features, ontogenetic repatterning, and modiŽ ed patterns of organogenesis), and reproductive mode (the presumed ancestral egg-laying vs. direct development and viviparity) is correlated and potentially causal for certain patterns. Such correlations are being explored using a variety of approaches, and examples of this work-in-progress are provided.

Journal

Animal BiologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2003

Keywords: DIRECT DEVELOPMENT; AMPHIBIANS; GENOME SIZES; VIVIPARITY

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