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Representation and Identity: The Right of Persons Belonging to Minorities to Effective Participation in Public Affairs

Representation and Identity: The Right of Persons Belonging to Minorities to Effective... Annelies Verstichel * Representation and Identity: Th e Right of Persons Belonging to Minorities to Eff ective Participation in Public Aff airs I. Introduction Representation and ethnic, religious, or linguistic identity have been linked up and presented to us on our TV screens as a solution in the context of, inter alia, ending violent confl ict. Th e war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, for instance, was put to an end in  with the signing of the General Framework Agreement for Peace, more com- monly known as the Dayton Peace Agreement. Bosnia and Herzegovina’s post-war constitution—Annex  of the Dayton Peace Agreement —established a complex insti- tutional formula along ethnonational lines. Representation is predominantly based on ethnic identity. Th e upper house or the House of Peoples, for example, consists of  delegates: fi ve from each of the three ethnic groups recognized as constituent peoples, namely Serbs, Croats and Bosniacs. Th e decisions in both parliamentary chambers are taken by a majority, which should include at least one third of the votes of delegates from the territory of each entity, i.e., the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (com- prised predominantly of Bosniacs and Croats) and the Republika Srpska http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

Representation and Identity: The Right of Persons Belonging to Minorities to Effective Participation in Public Affairs

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/22116117-90001643
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Annelies Verstichel * Representation and Identity: Th e Right of Persons Belonging to Minorities to Eff ective Participation in Public Aff airs I. Introduction Representation and ethnic, religious, or linguistic identity have been linked up and presented to us on our TV screens as a solution in the context of, inter alia, ending violent confl ict. Th e war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, for instance, was put to an end in  with the signing of the General Framework Agreement for Peace, more com- monly known as the Dayton Peace Agreement. Bosnia and Herzegovina’s post-war constitution—Annex  of the Dayton Peace Agreement —established a complex insti- tutional formula along ethnonational lines. Representation is predominantly based on ethnic identity. Th e upper house or the House of Peoples, for example, consists of  delegates: fi ve from each of the three ethnic groups recognized as constituent peoples, namely Serbs, Croats and Bosniacs. Th e decisions in both parliamentary chambers are taken by a majority, which should include at least one third of the votes of delegates from the territory of each entity, i.e., the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (com- prised predominantly of Bosniacs and Croats) and the Republika Srpska

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Feb 9, 2010

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