Repetition effects of features and spatial position: evidence for dissociable mechanisms

Repetition effects of features and spatial position: evidence for dissociable mechanisms Spatial Vision , Vol. 22, No. 4, pp. 325 – 338 (2009) © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2009. Also available online - www.brill.nl/sv Repetition effects of features and spatial position: evidence for dissociable mechanisms GIANLUCA CAMPANA ∗ and CLARA CASCO Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Italy Received 20 October 2008; accepted 19 February 2009 Abstract —While repetition of a feature (position) unrelated to a response is acknowledged to be facilitatory, there is disagreement on whether priming for response-defining feature or spatial position is facilitatory or inhibitory. To address this question, we used simple feature targets to analyze the interactions between facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms associated to the repetition of features and position, for responses given either to the feature or to the position. We were able to reproduce the general facilitatory effect when a feature was repeated, and the inhibitory effect when it was changed, although these feature priming effects were always in interaction with repetition effects of spatial position. The most interesting finding, however, was that repetition of spatial position showed facilitation when non-response-defining, and inhibition when coincident with the response (response-defining); that is, repetition effects of spatial position are strictly dependent on the object http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010) Brill

Repetition effects of features and spatial position: evidence for dissociable mechanisms

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2009 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0169-1015
eISSN
1568-5683
D.O.I.
10.1163/156856809788746318
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spatial Vision , Vol. 22, No. 4, pp. 325 – 338 (2009) © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2009. Also available online - www.brill.nl/sv Repetition effects of features and spatial position: evidence for dissociable mechanisms GIANLUCA CAMPANA ∗ and CLARA CASCO Department of General Psychology, University of Padova, Italy Received 20 October 2008; accepted 19 February 2009 Abstract —While repetition of a feature (position) unrelated to a response is acknowledged to be facilitatory, there is disagreement on whether priming for response-defining feature or spatial position is facilitatory or inhibitory. To address this question, we used simple feature targets to analyze the interactions between facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms associated to the repetition of features and position, for responses given either to the feature or to the position. We were able to reproduce the general facilitatory effect when a feature was repeated, and the inhibitory effect when it was changed, although these feature priming effects were always in interaction with repetition effects of spatial position. The most interesting finding, however, was that repetition of spatial position showed facilitation when non-response-defining, and inhibition when coincident with the response (response-defining); that is, repetition effects of spatial position are strictly dependent on the object

Journal

Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 2009

Keywords: FOR; PRIMING; IOR; REPETITION EFFECT

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