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Rents and entitlements: reassessing Africa’s urban pasts and futures

Rents and entitlements: reassessing Africa’s urban pasts and futures This article considers recent literature on contemporary urbanization in Africa that is united in its ‘post-normative’ orientation, firmly discarding the ‘expectations’ of modernization that so deeply shaped twentieth-century research on African cities. Best typified by the work of urban anthropologists such as Abdoumaliq Simone, this scholarship instead focuses on the ‘vernacularization’ of urban structures and strategies in Africa. While such work has developed a host of new insights into the idiosyncratic nature of African urbanization, it has largely eschewed comparative analysis of enduring economic strategies that lie at the heart of the massive growth of African cities. By focusing on the longer-term historical role of such processes – namely urban rents and urban price regulations – this article suggests a more comparative framework for the study of urban Africa that still accounts for the otherwise seemingly hyper-local and idiosyncratic forms of urban livelihoods and strategies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Afrika Focus Brill

Rents and entitlements: reassessing Africa’s urban pasts and futures

Afrika Focus , Volume 26 (1): 13 – Feb 26, 2013

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0772-084X
eISSN
2031-356X
DOI
10.1163/2031356X-02601004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article considers recent literature on contemporary urbanization in Africa that is united in its ‘post-normative’ orientation, firmly discarding the ‘expectations’ of modernization that so deeply shaped twentieth-century research on African cities. Best typified by the work of urban anthropologists such as Abdoumaliq Simone, this scholarship instead focuses on the ‘vernacularization’ of urban structures and strategies in Africa. While such work has developed a host of new insights into the idiosyncratic nature of African urbanization, it has largely eschewed comparative analysis of enduring economic strategies that lie at the heart of the massive growth of African cities. By focusing on the longer-term historical role of such processes – namely urban rents and urban price regulations – this article suggests a more comparative framework for the study of urban Africa that still accounts for the otherwise seemingly hyper-local and idiosyncratic forms of urban livelihoods and strategies.

Journal

Afrika FocusBrill

Published: Feb 26, 2013

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