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Regulating Natural Resource Funds: Alaska Heritage Trust Fund, Alberta Permanent Fund, and Government Pension Fund of Norway

Regulating Natural Resource Funds: Alaska Heritage Trust Fund, Alberta Permanent Fund, and... The paper is a comparative regulatory analysis of the Alaska Heritage Trust Fund, the Alberta Permanent Fund, and the Government Pension Fund of Norway, as developed country natural resource fund (nrf) models. Its objective is to examine how nrfs are regulated. To achieve this objective, it explores and compares the socio-political contexts and regulatory features of the three nrfs, drawing lessons along the way. Given the dearth of publications on the domestic as opposed to the transnational regulation of nrfs, it carries out an original review of primary and secondary policy sources, both legal and non-legal documents, along with a synthesis of representative bodies of literature. It finds that nrfs are mainly regulated by laws and institutional support, which constitute four key regulatory features: legal frameworks and objectives, ownership regimes, structure and functionality, and governance and operation. The conclusion is that how nrfs are regulated, based on these features, determines their outcomes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Journal of Comparative Law Brill

Regulating Natural Resource Funds: Alaska Heritage Trust Fund, Alberta Permanent Fund, and Government Pension Fund of Norway

Global Journal of Comparative Law , Volume 6 (2): 36 – Jul 7, 2017

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2211-9051
eISSN
2211-906X
DOI
10.1163/2211906X-00602002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The paper is a comparative regulatory analysis of the Alaska Heritage Trust Fund, the Alberta Permanent Fund, and the Government Pension Fund of Norway, as developed country natural resource fund (nrf) models. Its objective is to examine how nrfs are regulated. To achieve this objective, it explores and compares the socio-political contexts and regulatory features of the three nrfs, drawing lessons along the way. Given the dearth of publications on the domestic as opposed to the transnational regulation of nrfs, it carries out an original review of primary and secondary policy sources, both legal and non-legal documents, along with a synthesis of representative bodies of literature. It finds that nrfs are mainly regulated by laws and institutional support, which constitute four key regulatory features: legal frameworks and objectives, ownership regimes, structure and functionality, and governance and operation. The conclusion is that how nrfs are regulated, based on these features, determines their outcomes.

Journal

Global Journal of Comparative LawBrill

Published: Jul 7, 2017

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