Reflections on the Peacekeeping Failure in Darfur: Is There Any Substance to the 'Responsibility to Protect'?

Reflections on the Peacekeeping Failure in Darfur: Is There Any Substance to the 'Responsibility... Journal of International Peacekeeping 13 (2009) 294–326 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2009 DOI 10.1163/187541009X12463418050696 brill.nl/joup J O U P * ) Country Program Coordinator, World Vision Australia; Masters Candidate, Faculty of Law, University of Melbourne. Th is paper draws on the experiences of the author with the International Refl ections on the Peacekeeping Failure in Darfur: Is Th ere Any Substance to the ‘Responsibility to Protect’? Rebecca Barber * Faculty of Law, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria 3010, Australia r.barber@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au Abstract Th is paper examines the failure of the African Mission in Sudan (AMIS) to provide protection to civilians in Darfur, and considers the relevance, in this context, of the emerging doctrine of responsibility to protect. It is argued that while the existence of the responsibility to protect has been widely endorsed, there has been relatively scant attention paid to its content. In the context of the AMIS intervention in Darfur, this paper considers the question of what the responsibility to protect actually entails: for peace-support operations, for the states that send them, and most importantly, for the civilian population that expects to be protected by the soldiers sent to pro- tect them. Because the responsibility to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of International Peacekeeping Brill

Reflections on the Peacekeeping Failure in Darfur: Is There Any Substance to the 'Responsibility to Protect'?

Journal of International Peacekeeping, Volume 13 (3-4): 294 – Jan 1, 2009

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2009 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1875-4104
eISSN
1875-4112
D.O.I.
10.1163/187541009X12463418050696
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Journal of International Peacekeeping 13 (2009) 294–326 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2009 DOI 10.1163/187541009X12463418050696 brill.nl/joup J O U P * ) Country Program Coordinator, World Vision Australia; Masters Candidate, Faculty of Law, University of Melbourne. Th is paper draws on the experiences of the author with the International Refl ections on the Peacekeeping Failure in Darfur: Is Th ere Any Substance to the ‘Responsibility to Protect’? Rebecca Barber * Faculty of Law, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria 3010, Australia r.barber@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au Abstract Th is paper examines the failure of the African Mission in Sudan (AMIS) to provide protection to civilians in Darfur, and considers the relevance, in this context, of the emerging doctrine of responsibility to protect. It is argued that while the existence of the responsibility to protect has been widely endorsed, there has been relatively scant attention paid to its content. In the context of the AMIS intervention in Darfur, this paper considers the question of what the responsibility to protect actually entails: for peace-support operations, for the states that send them, and most importantly, for the civilian population that expects to be protected by the soldiers sent to pro- tect them. Because the responsibility to

Journal

Journal of International PeacekeepingBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2009

Keywords: INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW; UNION; AFRICAN; PEACE-SUPPORT OPERATIONS; DARFUR; RESPONSIBILITY TO PROTECT; HUMAN RIGHTS LAW

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