Recolonisation by nematodes of hot water treated cooking banana planting material in Uganda

Recolonisation by nematodes of hot water treated cooking banana planting material in Uganda Nematology , 2004, Vol. 6(2), 215-221 Recolonisation by nematodes of hot water treated cooking banana planting material in Uganda Annemie E LSEN 1 , ∗ , Ben G OOSSENS 1 , Barbara B ELPAIRE 1 , Annemie N EYENS 1 , Paul S PEIJER 2 , † and Dirk D E W AELE 1 1 Laboratory of Tropical Crop Improvement, Catholic University Leuven (K. U. Leuven), Kasteelpark Arenberg 13, 3001, Leuven, Belgium 2 East and Southern African Regional Centre, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, P.O. Box 7878, Kampala, Uganda Received: 28 May 2003; revised: 9 December 2003 Accepted for publication: 9 January 2004 Summary – In East Africa, the cooking bananas ( Musa spp., AAA group, subgroup Matoke) are the major food crop. Yields are decreasing due to increasing damage caused by a complex of pests and diseases, including plant-parasitic nematodes. Planting of infected material is the principle means of dispersal for these nematodes. An option to control the nematodes in planting material is hot water treatment but the benefits depend on the rate of recolonisation. Therefore, on-farm trials were carried out at five localities representing Musa production systems in Uganda. Hot water treatment of planting material slowed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nematology Brill

Recolonisation by nematodes of hot water treated cooking banana planting material in Uganda

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2004 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1388-5545
eISSN
1568-5411
D.O.I.
10.1163/1568541041217997
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nematology , 2004, Vol. 6(2), 215-221 Recolonisation by nematodes of hot water treated cooking banana planting material in Uganda Annemie E LSEN 1 , ∗ , Ben G OOSSENS 1 , Barbara B ELPAIRE 1 , Annemie N EYENS 1 , Paul S PEIJER 2 , † and Dirk D E W AELE 1 1 Laboratory of Tropical Crop Improvement, Catholic University Leuven (K. U. Leuven), Kasteelpark Arenberg 13, 3001, Leuven, Belgium 2 East and Southern African Regional Centre, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, P.O. Box 7878, Kampala, Uganda Received: 28 May 2003; revised: 9 December 2003 Accepted for publication: 9 January 2004 Summary – In East Africa, the cooking bananas ( Musa spp., AAA group, subgroup Matoke) are the major food crop. Yields are decreasing due to increasing damage caused by a complex of pests and diseases, including plant-parasitic nematodes. Planting of infected material is the principle means of dispersal for these nematodes. An option to control the nematodes in planting material is hot water treatment but the benefits depend on the rate of recolonisation. Therefore, on-farm trials were carried out at five localities representing Musa production systems in Uganda. Hot water treatment of planting material slowed

Journal

NematologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2004

Keywords: HELICOTYLENCHUS MULTICINCTUS; EAST AFRICAN HIGHLAND BANANAS; RADOPHOLUS SIMILIS; PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH; ON-FARM TRIAL; PRATYLENCHUS GOODEYI

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