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Reactivating Husserl’s Crisis

Reactivating Husserl’s Crisis Dermot Moran. Husserl’s Crisis of the European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction . Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2012. xv + 323 pp. There is something both ironic and intriguing about the very idea of an introduction to Husserl’s Crisis of the European Sciences . This is because, as Moran reminds us right at the beginning of his book: “The Crisis claims to offer an introduction to transcendental phenomenology” (3). Moran’s work is thus a kind of introduction ‘squared,’ as it were, that is, an introduction to an introduction. Leaving aside all sociological and pedagogical considerations about the increasing amount of introductions, handbooks, companions, readers, etc., in today’s academic philosophy, one can hardly resist raising a question as to why Husserl’s putatively “definitive” (48) introduction to transcendental phenomenology stands in need of being introduced. And if Husserl’s Crisis does stand in need of an introduction, does not precisely this fact mark its failure as an introduction ? Part of what this reviewer considers a major achievement of Moran’s book is that, far from exposing Husserl’s Crisis as a failure, it renders its work as an introduction possible for contemporary readers. As a matter of fact, not only http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Reactivating Husserl’s Crisis

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 44 (1): 152 – Mar 26, 2014

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Review Articles
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/15691640-12341282
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dermot Moran. Husserl’s Crisis of the European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction . Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2012. xv + 323 pp. There is something both ironic and intriguing about the very idea of an introduction to Husserl’s Crisis of the European Sciences . This is because, as Moran reminds us right at the beginning of his book: “The Crisis claims to offer an introduction to transcendental phenomenology” (3). Moran’s work is thus a kind of introduction ‘squared,’ as it were, that is, an introduction to an introduction. Leaving aside all sociological and pedagogical considerations about the increasing amount of introductions, handbooks, companions, readers, etc., in today’s academic philosophy, one can hardly resist raising a question as to why Husserl’s putatively “definitive” (48) introduction to transcendental phenomenology stands in need of being introduced. And if Husserl’s Crisis does stand in need of an introduction, does not precisely this fact mark its failure as an introduction ? Part of what this reviewer considers a major achievement of Moran’s book is that, far from exposing Husserl’s Crisis as a failure, it renders its work as an introduction possible for contemporary readers. As a matter of fact, not only

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Mar 26, 2014

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