Range Use Patterns and Spatial Relationships of Merriam's Kangaroo Rats (Dipodomys Merriami)

Range Use Patterns and Spatial Relationships of Merriam's Kangaroo Rats (Dipodomys Merriami) RANGE USE PATTERNS AND SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS OF MERRIAM'S KANGAROO RATS (DIPODOMYS MERRIAMI) by PHILIP BEHRENDS1), MARTIN DALY and MARGO I. WILSON2) (Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1, Canada) (With 3 Figures) (Acc. I-V-1985) Merriam's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys merriami; Rodentia: Heteromyidae) is a nocturnal, burrow-dwelling rodent, widespread in the arid southwest of North America. Kangaroo rats are characterized by their large, powerful rear legs which enable them to move bipedally across open ground in a saltatory fashion and by their external, fur-lined cheek pouches which are used to transport seeds, green vegetation, and occasionally insects back to their home burrows or to surface caches. Kangaroo rats have been the objects of a great deal of ecological, anatomical, and physiological research. Indeed, REICHMAN & BROWN (1983) introduce a collection of recent reviews of heteromyid research with the suggestion that kangaroo rats and their allies are better known with respect to "comparative anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, and evolution" than any other mammalian group. However, what is known about the behaviour of these nocturnally active, burrow-dwelling rodents is largely inferred from indirect evidence, especially from trap- ping data, and presents certain anomalies with respect to current theories of sexual http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Range Use Patterns and Spatial Relationships of Merriam's Kangaroo Rats (Dipodomys Merriami)

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 1986 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853986X00478
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

RANGE USE PATTERNS AND SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS OF MERRIAM'S KANGAROO RATS (DIPODOMYS MERRIAMI) by PHILIP BEHRENDS1), MARTIN DALY and MARGO I. WILSON2) (Department of Psychology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1, Canada) (With 3 Figures) (Acc. I-V-1985) Merriam's kangaroo rat (Dipodomys merriami; Rodentia: Heteromyidae) is a nocturnal, burrow-dwelling rodent, widespread in the arid southwest of North America. Kangaroo rats are characterized by their large, powerful rear legs which enable them to move bipedally across open ground in a saltatory fashion and by their external, fur-lined cheek pouches which are used to transport seeds, green vegetation, and occasionally insects back to their home burrows or to surface caches. Kangaroo rats have been the objects of a great deal of ecological, anatomical, and physiological research. Indeed, REICHMAN & BROWN (1983) introduce a collection of recent reviews of heteromyid research with the suggestion that kangaroo rats and their allies are better known with respect to "comparative anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, and evolution" than any other mammalian group. However, what is known about the behaviour of these nocturnally active, burrow-dwelling rodents is largely inferred from indirect evidence, especially from trap- ping data, and presents certain anomalies with respect to current theories of sexual

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1986

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