Private Agriculture in the Soviet UnionUnder Gorbachev

Private Agriculture in the Soviet UnionUnder Gorbachev ARTICLE STEPHEN K WEGREN (Moraga, CA, U.S.A.) PRIVATE AGRIC ULT URE IN THE SOVIET UNION UNDER GORBACHEV* Introduction ' The Soviet regime has always been dependent upon privately grown produce to meet the nation's food requirements. Even during and after Stalin's collectivization of agriculture, the need for food led Stalin to permit grudgingly the continuation of small-scale private plots.1 Stalin's tolerance of private pro- duction was recorded both in 1930 and again in 1935 in the Model Collective Farm Charters, which guaranteed the retention of private plots of limited size. Moreover, private trading was for- malized in 1932, when what had been rather chaotic channels of private trade were replaced by a legalized system of kolkhoz markets where the peasant could sell his private produce.2 Today, the regime continues to rely upon private plot pro- duction in order to satisfy the country's food requirements. * The research for this article was completed while serving as a MacArthur Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Center on East-West Trade, Investment and Communications, Duke University. A research trip to Kostroma Oblast' during March-April 1990, also sponsored by the Center on East-West Trade, contributed to this article. I wish to thank Professor Vladimir Treml http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Soviet and Post Soviet Review Brill

Private Agriculture in the Soviet UnionUnder Gorbachev

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1989 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-1262
eISSN
1876-3324
D.O.I.
10.1163/187633289X00076
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ARTICLE STEPHEN K WEGREN (Moraga, CA, U.S.A.) PRIVATE AGRIC ULT URE IN THE SOVIET UNION UNDER GORBACHEV* Introduction ' The Soviet regime has always been dependent upon privately grown produce to meet the nation's food requirements. Even during and after Stalin's collectivization of agriculture, the need for food led Stalin to permit grudgingly the continuation of small-scale private plots.1 Stalin's tolerance of private pro- duction was recorded both in 1930 and again in 1935 in the Model Collective Farm Charters, which guaranteed the retention of private plots of limited size. Moreover, private trading was for- malized in 1932, when what had been rather chaotic channels of private trade were replaced by a legalized system of kolkhoz markets where the peasant could sell his private produce.2 Today, the regime continues to rely upon private plot pro- duction in order to satisfy the country's food requirements. * The research for this article was completed while serving as a MacArthur Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Center on East-West Trade, Investment and Communications, Duke University. A research trip to Kostroma Oblast' during March-April 1990, also sponsored by the Center on East-West Trade, contributed to this article. I wish to thank Professor Vladimir Treml

Journal

The Soviet and Post Soviet ReviewBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1989

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